The Capitol Report | November 8th, 2018

Election Results

Thank you very much for your support and votes during this election cycle. As a result, I will return to Jefferson City this January.

Tuesday’s midterm election saw approximately 58 percent of Missouri’s registered voters participate by casting a ballot. The figure is the highest the state has seen for a midterm since 1994 when 59 percent of voters participated in the process.

The day after the election, lawmakers traveled to the State Capitol to decide their leadership team for the 100th General Assembly that begins in January. The 116 members of the House Republican Caucus voted on a number of positions that will help set the legislative agenda and lead the House during the 2019 legislative session.

In addition to selecting candidates for various offices, Missouri voters went to the polls Tuesday to decide on ballot initiatives dealing with topics ranging from a gas tax increase to the legalization of medical marijuana. When the day was done, voters had approved three changes to the Missouri Constitution and one change to state law. They are as follows:

  • Amendment 1 (Clean Missouri) – This amendment to the Missouri Constitution will change the legislative redistricting process so that it is overseen by a state demographer appointed by the State Auditor, and then reviewed by a citizen commission. The amendment also sets campaign donation limits, creates a two-year revolving door ban against legislators becoming lobbyists, and requires legislative records and proceedings to be open to the public.
  • Amendment 2 (Medical Marijuana) – Another constitutional amendment will allow patients with cancer, HIV, epilepsy and some other conditions to have access to medical marijuana. It will change the state constitution to tax marijuana at 4 percent and allocate the $18 million in annual taxes and fees to veterans programs. The measure will cost the state $7 million in annual operating costs. It will give regulatory authority for licensing the cultivation, testing and sale of marijuana to the Department of Health and Senior Services. The state will be responsible for a “seed-to-sale tracking system” to ensure marijuana only goes to qualified patients.
  • Amendment 4 (Bingo) – The constitutional amendment will allow individuals who have, for at least six months, been a bona fide member of an organization licensed to conduct bingo to participate in the operation of a bingo game. The Constitution currently requires at least two years of membership prior to participation. It will also remove the statutory restrictions on the advertisement of bingo.
  • Proposition B (Minimum Wage Increase) – A change to state law approved by voters will increase Missouri’s minimum wage, which currently stands at $7.85. Proposition B will increase the minimum wage starting in 2019 to $8.60 and will then increase it each year by 85 cents until it reaches $12 per hour in 2023.

Also, as we celebrate Veterans Day this year, I hope you and your family will take time to talk about the significant contributions our veterans have made, and continue to make. We would not be the greatest nation on this planet today without their service and sacrifices, and our future would not be nearly as bright without the leadership they will continue to provide in the years to come.

If you ever have questions, comments, or concerns, please call my office at 573-751-1688 or email me at:
jason.chipman@house.mo.gov

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

 

Strong Voter Turnout Sustains Republican Majorities

An Election Day that saw the highest voter turnout for a midterm in more than 20 years resulted in House Republicans keeping their supermajorities in both chambers of the Missouri General Assembly. When the 100th General Assembly begins in January 2019, House Republicans will control 116 of the body’s 163 seats. In the Missouri Senate, Republicans will control 24 of the 34 seats.

Republicans also flipped the U.S. Senate seat that had been held by Claire McCaskill. Republican Attorney General Josh Hawley picked up more than 51 percent of the vote to defeat the Democratic incumbent. With McCaskill’s loss, State Auditor Nicole Galloway is now the only Democratic statewide officeholder. Republicans also control six of the state’s eight Congressional seats.

Tuesday’s midterm election saw approximately 58 percent of Missouri’s registered voters participate by casting a ballot. The figure is the highest the state has seen for a midterm since 1994 when 59 percent of voters participated in the process.

House Republicans Caucus to Decide Leadership

The day after the election that saw Republicans continue their dominance, lawmakers traveled to the State Capitol to decide their leadership team for the 100th General Assembly that begins in January. The 116 members of the House Republican Caucus voted on a number of positions that will help set the legislative agenda and lead the House during the 2019 legislative session.

Members decided on the following leadership team:

Speaker of the House: Rep. Elijah Haahr

Speaker Pro Tem: Rep. John Wiemann

Majority Floor Leader: Rep. Rob Vescovo

Assistant Majority Floor Leader: Rep. J Eggleston

Majority Whip: Rep. Steve Lynch

Majority Caucus Chair:  Rep. Sonya Anderson

Majority Caucus Secretary: Rep. Chris Dinkins

Policy Development Chair: Rep. Jeff Messenger

Following the caucus elections, Speaker-designee Elijah Haahr and Majority Floor Leader Rob Vescovo released the following statement regarding the leadership team for the upcoming legislative session:

“Throughout the past months, Republicans presented bold, 21st Century solutions to develop a strong workforce and create jobs, offering Missourians a chance to achieve the American Dream.  Last night, voters sent a clear message affirming our vision for the future of Missouri by electing one of the largest majorities in the history of the House of Representatives.  We are honored by the trust and confidence in our colleagues to lead our united Republican majority to serve the people of Missouri.  Now with our strong leadership team in place, House Republicans are eager to begin the work of governing and remain committed to putting our solutions into action.”

Midterm Election Sees a Number of Ballot Initiatives Approved

In addition to selecting candidates for various offices, Missouri voters went to the polls Tuesday to decide on ballot initiatives dealing with topics ranging from a gas tax increase to the legalization of medical marijuana. When the day was done, voters had approved three changes to the Missouri Constitution and one change to state law.

The ballot initiatives approved by Missouri voters include:

  • Amendment 1 (Clean Missouri) – This amendment to the Missouri Constitution will change the legislative redistricting process so that it is overseen by a state demographer appointed by the State Auditor, and then reviewed by a citizen commission. The current process calls for a bipartisan panel selected by the governor to oversee the process. The amendment also sets campaign donation limits at $2,500 for the state Senate and $2,000 for the House. The current state law sets the mark at $2,600. Amendment 1 also creates a two-year revolving door ban against legislators becoming lobbyists; eliminates the majority of lobbyist gifts worth more than $5; limits the ability of individuals and organizations to circumvent the contribution cap limits by counting the money from single-source committees toward the totals for the actual original donors; puts an end to legislative fundraising on state property; and requires legislative records and proceedings to be open to the public.
  • Amendment 2 (Medical Marijuana) – Another constitutional amendment will allow patients with cancer, HIV, epilepsy and some other conditions to have access to medical marijuana. It will change the state constitution to tax marijuana at 4 percent and allocate the $18 million in annual taxes and fees to veterans programs. The measure will cost the state $7 million in annual operating costs. It will also generate $6 million annually for local governments. It will give regulatory authority for licensing the cultivation, testing and sale of marijuana to the Department of Health and Senior Services. The state will be responsible for a “seed-to-sale tracking system” to ensure marijuana only goes to qualified patients.
  • Amendment 4 (Bingo) – Voters approved a constitutional amendment put on the ballot by lawmakers to change provisions in the Missouri Constitution dealing with the regulation of bingo. The constitutional amendment will allow individuals who have, for at least six months, been a bona fide member of an organization licensed to conduct bingo to participate in the operation of a bingo game. The Constitution currently requires at least two years of membership prior to participation. It will also remove the statutory restrictions on the advertisement of bingo.
  • Proposition B (Minimum Wage Increase) – A change to state law approved by voters will increase Missouri’s minimum wage, which currently stands at $7.85. Proposition B will increase the minimum wage starting in 2019 to $8.60 and will then increase it each year by 85 cents until it reaches $12 per hour in 2023.

Paying Tribute to Our Heroes

As we celebrate Veterans Day this year, I hope you and your family will take time to talk about the significant contributions our veterans have made, and continue to make. We would not be the greatest nation on this planet today without their service and sacrifices, and our future would not be nearly as bright without the leadership they will continue to provide in the years to come.

 

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

 

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The Capitol Report | November 1st, 2018

Amendment 1

As Election Day is almost here, I will wrap-up the statewide ballot measures approved to appear on the ballot this November. This week, I will cover Amendment 1.

Amendment 1 Official Ballot Title:

Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended to:

  • change process and criteria for redrawing state legislative districts during reapportionment;
  • change limits on campaign contributions that candidates for state legislature can accept from individuals or entities;
  • establish a limit on gifts that state legislators, and their employees, can accept from paid lobbyists;
  • prohibit state legislators, and their employees, from serving as paid lobbyists for a period of time;
  • prohibit political fundraising by candidates for or members of the state legislature on State property; and
  • require legislative records and proceedings to be open to the public?

State governmental entities estimate annual operating costs may increase by $189,000. Local governmental entities expect no fiscal impact.

Concerns with the measure involve $325,000 in “dark money” donations the initiative has received. Moreover, the redistricting change would put the process in the hands of an unelected political appointee who could manipulate legislative districts so that neighborhoods and communities are divided into multiple districts. While transparency in government is good, it is important that the communications between citizens and their elected officials remain private so that the health, financial, or legal issues of citizens will not become public knowledge.

Fair Ballot Language:

“yes” vote will amend the Missouri Constitution to change the process and criteria for redrawing state legislative district boundaries during reapportionment (redistricting). Currently, bipartisan house and senate commissions redraw boundaries and those maps are adopted if 70% of the commissioners approve the maps.

This amendment has a state demographer chosen from a panel selected by the state auditor redraw the boundaries and submit those maps to the house and senate commissions.  This amendment would then allow changes to the demographer’s maps only if 70% of the commissioners vote to make changes and do so within two months after receiving the maps from the state demographer.

The amendment also reduces the limits on campaign contributions that candidates for state senator or state representative can accept from individuals or entities by $100 per election for a senate candidate and $500 for a house candidate. The amendment creates a $5 limit on gifts that state legislators and their employees can accept from paid lobbyists or the lobbyists’ clients, and prohibits state legislators and their employees from serving as paid lobbyists for a period of two years after the end of their last legislative session.

The amendment prohibits political fundraising by candidates for or members of the state legislature on State property.  The amendment further requires all legislative records and proceedings to be subject to the state open meetings and records law (Missouri Sunshine Law).

“no” vote will not amend the Missouri Constitution regarding redistricting, campaign contributions, lobbyist gifts, limits on lobbying after political service, fundraising locations, and legislative records and proceedings. If passed, this measure will have no impact on taxes.

If you ever have questions, comments, or concerns, please call my office at 573-751-1688 or email me at: jason.chipman@house.mo.gov

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

 

Statewide Ballot Measures

This election, November 6th, the citizens of Missouri will have several legislative/constitutional issues to decide. As of 2018, citizens are required to file at least 100,126 valid signatures for initiated state statutes and veto referendums, and are required to file at least 160,199 valid signatures for initiated constitutional amendments. These signature requirements are the requirement if petitioners collect signatures in the smallest of the state’s congressional districts to satisfy the state’s distribution requirement. Collecting signatures in larger districts would result in a slightly larger signature requirement.

As Election Day is almost here, I will wrap-up the statewide ballot measures approved to appear on the ballot this November. This week, I will cover Amendment 1.

Amendment 1 Official Ballot Title:

Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended to:

  • change process and criteria for redrawing state legislative districts during reapportionment;
  • change limits on campaign contributions that candidates for state legislature can accept from individuals or entities;
  • establish a limit on gifts that state legislators, and their employees, can accept from paid lobbyists;
  • prohibit state legislators, and their employees, from serving as paid lobbyists for a period of time;
  • prohibit political fundraising by candidates for or members of the state legislature on State property; and
  • require legislative records and proceedings to be open to the public?

State governmental entities estimate annual operating costs may increase by $189,000. Local governmental entities expect no fiscal impact.

Concerns with the measure involve $325,000 in “dark money” donations the initiative has received. Moreover, the redistricting change would put the process in the hands of an unelected political appointee who could manipulate legislative districts so that neighborhoods and communities are divided into multiple districts. While transparency in government is good, it is important that the communications between citizens and their elected officials remain private so that the health, financial, or legal issues of citizens will not become public knowledge.

 Fair Ballot Language:

“yes” vote will amend the Missouri Constitution to change the process and criteria for redrawing state legislative district boundaries during reapportionment (redistricting).  Currently, bipartisan house and senate commissions redraw boundaries and those maps are adopted if 70% of the commissioners approve the maps.

This amendment has a state demographer chosen from a panel selected by the state auditor redraw the boundaries and submit those maps to the house and senate commissions.  This amendment would then allow changes to the demographer’s maps only if 70% of the commissioners vote to make changes and do so within two months after receiving the maps from the state demographer.

The amendment also reduces the limits on campaign contributions that candidates for state senator or state representative can accept from individuals or entities by $100 per election for a senate candidate and $500 for a house candidate. The amendment creates a $5 limit on gifts that state legislators and their employees can accept from paid lobbyists or the lobbyists’ clients, and prohibits state legislators and their employees from serving as paid lobbyists for a period of two years after the end of their last legislative session.

The amendment prohibits political fundraising by candidates for or members of the state legislature on State property.  The amendment further requires all legislative records and proceedings to be subject to the state open meetings and records law (Missouri Sunshine Law).

“no” vote will not amend the Missouri Constitution regarding redistricting, campaign contributions, lobbyist gifts, limits on lobbying after political service, fundraising locations, and legislative records and proceedings.

If passed, this measure will have no impact on taxes.

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

The Capitol Report | October 25th, 2018

As Election Day approaches, I will continue to recap the several statewide ballot measures approved to appear on the ballot this November. This week, I will cover Proposition B.

Proposition B Official Ballot Title:

Do you want to amend Missouri law to:

  • increase the state minimum wage to $8.60 per hour with 85 cents per hour increase each year until 2023, when the state minimum wage would be $12.00 per hour (Thereafter, the minimum wage would increase or decrease each year based on changes in the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers);
  • exempt government employers from the above increase; and
  • increase the penalty for paying employees less than the minimum wage (full amount of the wage rate plus an additional amount equal to twice the unpaid wages)?

State and local governments estimate no direct costs or savings from the proposal, but operating costs could increase by an unknown annual amount that could be significant. State and local government tax revenue could change by an unknown annual amount ranging from a $2.9 million decrease to a $214 million increase depending on business decisions.

Fair Ballot Language:

A “yes” vote will amend Missouri statutes to increase the state minimum wage rate as follows:

  • $8.60 per hour beginning January 1, 2019;
  • $9.45 per hour beginning January 1, 2020;
  • $10.30 per hour beginning January 1, 2021;
  • $11.15 per hour beginning January 1, 2022; and
  • $12.00 per hour beginning January 1, 2023.

The amendment will exempt government employers from the above increases, and will increase the penalty for paying employees less than the minimum wage.

A “no” vote will not amend Missouri law to make these changes to the state minimum wage law.

If passed, this measure will have no impact on taxes.

If you ever have questions, comments, or concerns, please call my office at 573-751-1688 or email me at: jason.chipman@house.mo.gov

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

 

Statewide Ballot Measures

This election, November 6th, the citizens of Missouri will have several legislative/constitutional issues to decide. As of 2018, citizens are required to file at least 100,126 valid signatures for initiated state statutes and veto referendums, and are required to file at least 160,199 valid signatures for initiated constitutional amendments. These signature requirements are the requirement if petitioners collect signatures in the smallest of the state’s congressional districts to satisfy the state’s distribution requirement. Collecting signatures in larger districts would result in a slightly larger signature requirement.

As Election Day approaches, I will continue to recap the several statewide ballot measures approved to appear on the ballot this November. This week, I will cover Proposition B.

Proposition B Official Ballot Title:

Do you want to amend Missouri law to:

  • increase the state minimum wage to $8.60 per hour with 85 cents per hour increase each year until 2023, when the state minimum wage would be $12.00 per hour (Thereafter, the minimum wage would increase or decrease each year based on changes in the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers);
  • exempt government employers from the above increase; and
  • increase the penalty for paying employees less than the minimum wage (full amount of the wage rate plus an additional amount equal to twice the unpaid wages)?

State and local governments estimate no direct costs or savings from the proposal, but operating costs could increase by an unknown annual amount that could be significant. State and local government tax revenue could change by an unknown annual amount ranging from a $2.9 million decrease to a $214 million increase depending on business decisions.

A “yes” vote will amend Missouri statutes to increase the state minimum wage rate as follows:

  • $8.60 per hour beginning January 1, 2019;
  • $9.45 per hour beginning January 1, 2020;
  • $10.30 per hour beginning January 1, 2021;
  • $11.15 per hour beginning January 1, 2022; and
  • $12.00 per hour beginning January 1, 2023.

The amendment will exempt government employers from the above increases, and will increase the penalty for paying employees less than the minimum wage.

A “no” vote will not amend Missouri law to make these changes to the state minimum wage law.

New Budget Explorer Site Provides Missourians with Detailed Look at the State Budget

Missourians interested in learning more about how their tax dollars are utilized in the state budget can access a new website recently unveiled by the Missouri Office of Administration. The new website, budgetexplorer.mo.gov, is designed to give users a comprehensive look at the state budget, as well as links to more detailed information.

The Missouri Budget Explorer website was created to give the public a simple, one-stop resource that contains everything they need to know about the state budget. Through the site, Missourians can explore the details of the budget and the sources of the state’s revenues. The site will allow visitors to see how the state allocates funds among the 16 executive departments, the elected officials, the legislature, and the judiciary.

The website utilizes infographics to help make the budget information more easily understandable for the public. The site is meant to give the public not only a better understanding of the state budgeting process, but also a better understanding of the role of each state department and the services they provide.

District Visits

I was honored to present Opal W. Rohrer, resident of Bourbon, a House Resolution commemorating her on her 100th birthday at a celebration held on Sunday, October 21st at the First United Methodist Church in Bourbon.

Born on October 19, 1918, Opal was married to Fred A. Rohrer, a gentleman with whom she raised three sons, Richard W. Rohrer, Roger D. Rohrer, and Robert F. Rohrer.

If you or a family member or friend in the district has a special occasion or achievement coming up and would like to be honored, please contact my office at 573-751-1688 or by email at jason.chipman@house.mo.gov

A special thanks to Cyndee Tracy (not pictured) and Joyce Corbett who gave me a tour of Cuba Manor earlier this week. Cuba Manor is a provider of long-term care services in the district.

Congratulations to the Steelville youth who won several awards recently at the 2018 Missouri Community Betterment Awards held during the 55th Annual MCB Conference in Columbia. I was honored to present the youth of Steelville with a resolution commemorating their accomplishments.

Missouri Community Betterment (MCB) is a program that helps numerous communities prosper and grow to their full potential. Steelville is one MCB community that has taken advantage of the program to become an even better place in which to learn, grow, and succeed.

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

The Capitol Report | October 18th, 2018

Proposition D

As Election Day approaches, I will continue to recap the several statewide ballot measures approved to appear on the ballot this November. This week, I will cover Proposition D. Also, note that Gov. Parson will be at the Price Chopper on 1360 Forum Dr., Rolla, MO on Friday, October 19th, 12 PM to 1 PM to discuss Proposition D.

Proposition D Official Ballot Title:

Shall Missouri law be amended to fund Missouri state law enforcement by increasing the motor fuel tax by two and one half cents per gallon annually for four years beginning July 1, 2019, exempt Special Olympic, Paralympic, and Olympic prizes from state taxes, and to establish the Emergency State Freight Bottleneck Fund?

If passed, this measure will generate at least $288 million annually to the State Road Fund to provide for the funding of Missouri state law enforcement and $123 million annually to local governments for road construction and maintenance.

  • Nineteen and one-half (19.5) cents per gallon beginning July 1, 2019;
  • Twenty-two (22) cents per gallon beginning July 1, 2020;
  • Twenty-four and one-half (24.5) cents per gallon beginning July 1, 2021;
  • Twenty-seven (27) cents per gallon beginning July 1, 2022.

The amendment will also increase the tax on alternative fuels used for motor vehicles (including compressed natural gas, liquid natural gas, and propane gas). The amendment will increase the rate from seventeen (17) cents to twenty-seven (27) cents per unit equivalent to a gallon of gasoline or diesel beginning January 1, 2026. The amendment will require the state auditor to audit the state’s use of the revenue generated by these taxes every two years.

Additionally, the amendment will allow a state income tax deduction for the value of any prize or award won in the Olympics, Paralympics, or Special Olympics; and it will create an “Emergency State Freight Bottleneck Fund” for major highway intersections subject to congestion, and will free up financing for road maintenance and improvement projects in the state.

A “yes” vote will amend Missouri statutes to fund the Missouri State Highway Patrol’s enforcement and administration of motor vehicle laws and traffic regulations. The source of the funding will be revenue from an increased state tax on motor fuel (including gasoline, diesel fuel, kerosene, and blended fuel). The current state motor fuel tax rate is seventeen (17) cents per gallon.

A “no” vote will not amend Missouri statutes to increase the motor fuel tax, exempt certain prizes from state taxes or establish the Emergency State Freight Bottleneck Fund.

If you ever have questions, comments, or concerns, please call my office at 573-751-1688 or email me at: jason.chipman@house.mo.gov

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

 

Statewide Ballot Measures

This election, November 6th, the citizens of Missouri will have several legislative/constitutional issues to decide. As of 2018, citizens are required to file at least 100,126 valid signatures for initiated state statutes and veto referendums, and are required to file at least 160,199 valid signatures for initiated constitutional amendments. These signature requirements are the requirement if petitioners collect signatures in the smallest of the state’s congressional districts to satisfy the state’s distribution requirement. Collecting signatures in larger districts would result in a slightly larger signature requirement.

As Election Day approaches, I will continue to recap the several statewide ballot measures approved to appear on the ballot this November. This week, I will cover Proposition D. Also, note that Gov. Parson will be at the Price Chopper on 1360 Forum Dr., Rolla, MO on Friday, October 19th, 12 PM to 1 PM to discuss Proposition D.

Proposition D Official Ballot Title:

Shall Missouri law be amended to fund Missouri state law enforcement by increasing the motor fuel tax by two and one half cents per gallon annually for four years beginning July 1, 2019, exempt Special Olympic, Paralympic, and Olympic prizes from state taxes, and to establish the Emergency State Freight Bottleneck Fund?

If passed, this measure will generate at least $288 million annually to the State Road Fund to provide for the funding of Missouri state law enforcement and $123 million annually to local governments for road construction and maintenance.

  • Nineteen and one-half (19.5) cents per gallon beginning July 1, 2019;
  • Twenty-two (22) cents per gallon beginning July 1, 2020;
  • Twenty-four and one-half (24.5) cents per gallon beginning July 1, 2021;
  • Twenty-seven (27) cents per gallon beginning July 1, 2022.

The amendment will also increase the tax on alternative fuels used for motor vehicles (including compressed natural gas, liquid natural gas, and propane gas). The amendment will increase the rate from seventeen (17) cents to twenty-seven (27) cents per unit equivalent to a gallon of gasoline or diesel beginning January 1, 2026. The amendment will require the state auditor to audit the state’s use of the revenue generated by these taxes every two years.

Additionally, the amendment will allow a state income tax deduction for the value of any prize or award won in the Olympics, Paralympics, or Special Olympics; and it will create an “Emergency State Freight Bottleneck Fund” for major highway intersections subject to congestion, and will free up financing for road maintenance and improvement projects in the state.

A “yes” vote will amend Missouri statutes to fund the Missouri State Highway Patrol’s enforcement and administration of motor vehicle laws and traffic regulations. The source of the funding will be revenue from an increased state tax on motor fuel (including gasoline, diesel fuel, kerosene, and blended fuel). The current state motor fuel tax rate is seventeen (17) cents per gallon.

A “no” vote will not amend Missouri statutes to increase the motor fuel tax, exempt certain prizes from state taxes or establish the Emergency State Freight Bottleneck Fund.

Missouri Officials to Appeal Ruling on Missouri Voter ID Law

A Missouri judge recently affirmed the constitutionality of the Missouri’s voter ID law while also striking down a provision requiring a voter lacking a photo ID to sign a sworn affidavit. The decision led both the Secretary of State and the Attorney General to announce they will appeal the ruling in an attempt to overturn it.

It was in 2016 that the Missouri General Assembly approved two measures designed to require a valid form of photo identification in order to vote. One was a proposed constitutional amendment that went on the November ballot and was then approved by more than 63 percent of Missouri voters, and the other was a statutory change that was signed into law by the governor. The two measures put the voter ID requirement into effect on June 1, 2017.

The judge ruled the voter ID law was within the General Assembly’s constitutional prerogative under the Missouri Constitution, but determined the section requiring a sworn affidavit for individuals who don’t have the proper photo ID was contradictory and misleading. The judge also ruled that the state cannot advertise that a photo ID is required to vote.

In response to the ruling, the Missouri Secretary of State announced he will seek to have the ruling put on hold while he appeals to a higher court. In a statement, he said, “Although our office does not agree with all of the judge’s findings, we’re pleased the court found that the voter ID law is constitutional, and the judge did not find anyone was prevented from voting. We plan to seek a stay and appeal the decision to a higher court, which we believe will overturn the judge’s errors.”

District Visit

Fort Good Shepherd RanchEarlier this week, I met up with Fort Good Shepherd Program Director Gregory Smith, JD, CADC, of Mission Gate Prison Ministry. Greg took the time to show me Fort Good Shepherd as well as Hannah’s Ranch in Cuba. Both were impressive facilities. Mission Gate Prison Ministry strives to help those in need of assistance reintegrating with society. To learn more about the work they do, visit: http://missiongateministry.org/home0.aspx

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

The Capitol Report | October 11th, 2018

REAL ID & Proposition C

Missourians will be able to use their Missouri-issued identification cards to fly domestically and visit federal installations until August of 2019. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) recently granted an extension to the state that will allow existing Missouri driver licenses and identification cards to be accepted by federal agencies until Aug. 1 of next year.

The grace period that was previously extended by DHS had been set to expire in January of 2019. Missouri requested an additional extension in order to have time to make new REAL ID-compliant licenses available. The state anticipates having the new driver licenses ready by March of 2019, so the extension until August will ensure Missourians are able to travel without interruption.

As Election Day approaches, I will continue to recap the several statewide ballot measures approved to appear on the ballot this November. This week, I will discuss Proposition C.

Proposition C Official Ballot Title:

Do you want to amend Missouri law to:

  • remove state prohibitions on personal use and possession of medical cannabis (marijuana) with a written certification by a physician who treats a patient diagnosed with a qualifying medical condition;
  • remove state prohibitions on growth, possession, production, and sale of medical marijuana by licensed and regulated facilities, and a facility’s licensed owners and employees;
  • impose a 2% tax on the retail sale of medical marijuana; and
  • use funds from this tax for veterans’ services, drug treatment, early childhood education, and for public safety in cities with a medical marijuana facility?

A “yes” vote will amend Missouri statutes to allow the use of marijuana for medical purposes under state laws.

A “no” vote will not amend Missouri statutes as to the use of marijuana.

If passed, this measure will impose a 2% retail sales tax on marijuana for medical purposes.

If you ever have questions, comments, or concerns, please call my office at 573-751-1688 or email me at: jason.chipman@house.mo.gov

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

 

REAL ID Update

Missourians will be able to use their Missouri-issued identification cards to fly domestically and visit federal installations until August of 2019. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) recently granted an extension to the state that will allow existing Missouri driver licenses and identification cards to be accepted by federal agencies until Aug. 1 of next year.

The grace period that was previously extended by DHS had been set to expire in January of 2019. Missouri requested an additional extension in order to have time to make new REAL ID-compliant licenses available. The state anticipates having the new driver licenses ready by March of 2019, so the extension until August will ensure Missourians are able to travel without interruption.

Statewide Ballot Measures

This election, November 6th, the citizens of Missouri will have several legislative/constitutional issues to decide. As of 2018, citizens are required to file at least 100,126 valid signatures for initiated state statutes and veto referendums, and are required to file at least 160,199 valid signatures for initiated constitutional amendments. These signature requirements are the requirement if petitioners collect signatures in the smallest of the state’s congressional districts to satisfy the state’s distribution requirement. Collecting signatures in larger districts would result in a slightly larger signature requirement.

As Election Day approaches, I will continue to recap the several statewide ballot measures approved to appear on the ballot this November. This week, I will cover Proposition C.

Proposition C Official Ballot Title:

Do you want to amend Missouri law to:

  • remove state prohibitions on personal use and possession of medical cannabis (marijuana) with a written certification by a physician who treats a patient diagnosed with a qualifying medical condition;
  • remove state prohibitions on growth, possession, production, and sale of medical marijuana by licensed and regulated facilities, and a facility’s licensed owners and employees;
  • impose a 2% tax on the retail sale of medical marijuana; and
  • use funds from this tax for veterans’ services, drug treatment, early childhood education, and for public safety in cities with a medical marijuana facility?

State government entities estimate initial and one-time costs of $2.6 million, annual costs of $10 million, and annual revenues of at least $10 million. Local government entities estimate no annual costs and are expected to have at least $152,000 in annual revenues.

This amendment does not change federal law, which makes marijuana possession, sale and cultivation a federal offense. This amendment creates regulations and licensing procedures for medical marijuana and medical marijuana facilities — dispensary, cultivation and production, and testing facilities.  This amendment creates licensing fees for such facilities. This amendment will impose a 2 percent tax on the retail sale of marijuana for medical purposes by dispensary facilities.  The funds from the license fees will go to the Division of Liquor Control to administer the program to license/certify and regulate marijuana and marijuana facilities.  The funds from the tax will be used for veterans’ services, drug treatment, early childhood education, and for public safety in cities with a medical marijuana facility.

  • A “yes” vote will amend Missouri statutes to allow the use of marijuana for medical purposes under state laws.
  • A “no” vote will not amend Missouri statutes as to the use of marijuana.

If passed, this measure will impose a 2% retail sales tax on marijuana for medical purposes.

District Visits

Yesterday, Angela DeLaria, MS, CRNA, Anesthesia Services, Phelps County Regional Medical Center in Rolla gave me a tremendous tour. I was able to meet several medical professionals, observe surgeries, and discuss the future of the medical profession.

Also, yesterday, Rolla High School Principal Dr. Jim Pritchett gave me a great tour of the high school. I was also able to visit with educators, Shannon Engelbrecht and Connie Shoemaker, of the Art Department and their creative students.

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

The Capitol Report | October 4th, 2018

Voter Registration Deadline October 10th

Tuesday, September 25th was National Voter Registration Day, which was created to remind Americans of the importance of voting and to raise awareness of voter registration opportunities. The day served as a call to Missourians who haven’t registered to vote for the November election to do so by the October 10 voter registration deadline. Missourians who are unsure of their voter registration status can check their status online at the Missouri Secretary of State’s website at this link: https://s1.sos.mo.gov/elections/voterlookup

As Election Day approaches, I will continue to recap the several statewide ballot measures approved to appear on the ballot this November. This week, I will discuss Amendment 4.

Amendment 4 Official Ballot Title:

Do you want to amend the Missouri constitution to:

  • remove language limiting bingo game advertising that a court ruled unenforceable; and
  • allow a member of a licensed organization conducting bingo games to participate in the management of bingo games after being a member of the organization for six months instead of the current two years?

As you may know, many community service organizations are struggling to gain and maintain membership. This ballot measure allows a member to help in the management of bingo games after six months of membership rather than the now required two years. Of course, the decision of who participates in game management is up to the affected organization.

Also, the original amendment (1980) restricted advertising beyond the premises of the organization. Another portion of this amendment would remove that restriction.

Governor Mike Parson announced recently that the first annual Parson Family Fall Festival will be held at the Missouri Governor’s Mansion on Saturday, October 6. The free event will run from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. and will feature vendors, activities for kids, and a bluegrass band for musical entertainment.

The event is free and open to the public, and no registration is required.  For further questions about this event, contact the Missouri Governor’s Mansion at 573-751-4141.

If you ever have questions, comments, or concerns, please call my office at 573-751-1688 or email me at: jason.chipman@house.mo.gov

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

 

 

Missouri Voter Registration Deadline is October 10

Tuesday, September 25th was National Voter Registration Day, which was created to remind Americans of the importance of voting and to raise awareness of voter registration opportunities. The day served as a call to Missourians who haven’t registered to vote for the November election to do so by the October 10 voter registration deadline.

National Voter Registration Day is a national holiday that celebrates democracy. It was first observed in 2012 and has continued to gain in popularity over the years as a way to encourage Americans to register to vote. In 2016 more than 750,000 voters used National Voter Registration Day to register to vote across all 50 states.

Missourians who are unsure of their voter registration status can check their status online at the Missouri Secretary of State’s website at this link: https://s1.sos.mo.gov/elections/voterlookup.

Individuals who are not registered to vote must meet the following criteria in order to register:

  • 17 ½ years of age to register, 18 years of age to vote
  • US Citizen
  • Missouri Resident

Potential voters cannot be:

  • Incarcerated, on parole, or probation due to a felony conviction.
  • Convicted of a felony related to voting or elections.

In order to register to vote, Missourians must submit a completed voter registration application to their local election authority. This can be done in person at the following locations:

  • The office of their local election authority
  • At a drivers licensing office while applying for or renewing a driver’s license
  • At a designated state agency while the applicant is obtaining services from the agency. Examples of state agencies providing registration applications to their clients include Division of Family Services, Military Recruitment, or WIC.
  • A library

When registering in person, applicants are required to present a form of personal identification. A voter can also register to vote by mail by completing a post card voter registration application. Missourians can request a voter registration application from the local election authority or from the Missouri Secretary of State website at the following link: https://s1.sos.mo.gov/votemissouri/request.

Missourians with any questions about the voter registration process are encouraged to call the Elections Division at 1 (800) Now Vote (669-8683).

Disability Council Seeks Nominations for Annual Awards

The Governor’s Council on Disability (GCD) is working to recognize outstanding Missourians with disabilities, as well as individuals and businesses who work with them to promote full participation and inclusion. The GCD is currently accepting nominations for its 2018 annual awards, including the Inclusion Award, the Youth Leadership Award, and the Website/IT Award. The deadline for submitting nominations is January 31, 2019.

The Inclusion Award is presented annually to recognize and honor a Missouri resident, organization, business or state/local government division that illustrates excellence in leadership for the “best of the best inclusion practices.” Innovative universal design and assistive technology concepts that incorporate people with disabilities may also be submitted. The nomination form and criteria are available at the following link: https://disability.mo.gov/gcd/inclwin.htm

The Youth Leadership Award recognizes an outstanding Missouri youth (age 16-26) with a disability that has demonstrated exemplary leadership by making a difference in their community. Youth with disabilities can be nominated at the following link: https://disability.mo.gov/gcd/youthleadershipaward.htm.

The Website/IT Award recognizes and honors a Missouri non-profit organization, business or local government that provides the most outstanding and accessible website. The nomination form and criteria are available online here: https://disability.mo.gov/gcd/websiteaward.htm.

Nominations may be submitted online, or via:

  • Fax (573-526-4109),
  • Email (gcd@oa.mo.gov), or
  • Mail (Governor’s Council on Disability, PO Box 1668, Jefferson City, MO 65102).

The award presentations will be made at the Power Up conference held in April of 2019 in Columbia. For more information or questions, contact the Governor’s Council on Disability at (573) 751-2600.

Missourians Invited to Inaugural Parson Family Fall Festival at the Missouri Governor’s Mansion

Governor Mike Parson announced recently that the first annual Parson Family Fall Festival will be held at the Missouri Governor’s Mansion on Saturday, October 6. The free event will run from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. and will feature vendors, activities for kids, and a bluegrass band for musical entertainment.

Over a dozen vendors will be on the Mansion South Lawn and driveway. There will also be a train for children to ride. Fall treats like caramel apples, fresh apple cider, and kettle corn will be provided. Activities will include a photo booth, pumpkin painting, straw maze, face paintings, and much more. Mansion tours will be made available and popular local performers will provide bluegrass music for everyone to enjoy.

”With fall upon us, there is no better time to have our Family Fall Festival, and we are incredibly honored to host this year’s festivities at the Missouri Governor’s Mansion,” said Governor Mike Parson and First Lady Teresa Parson in a joint statement. “We are looking forward to seeing everyone come out, participate in all of the activities, welcome in the fall season, and best of all – have fun!”

The event is free and open to the public, and no registration is required.  For further questions about this event, contact the Missouri Governor’s Mansion at 573-751-4141.

Statewide Ballot Measures

This election, November 6th, the citizens of Missouri will have several legislative/constitutional issues to decide. As of 2018, citizens are required to file at least 100,126 valid signatures for initiated state statutes and veto referendums, and are required to file at least 160,199 valid signatures for initiated constitutional amendments. These signature requirements are the requirement if petitioners collect signatures in the smallest of the state’s congressional districts to satisfy the state’s distribution requirement. Collecting signatures in larger districts would result in a slightly larger signature requirement.

As Election Day approaches, I will continue to recap the several statewide ballot measures approved to appear on the ballot this November. This week, I will cover Amendment 4.

Amendment 4 Official Ballot Title:

Do you want to amend the Missouri constitution to:

  • remove language limiting bingo game advertising that a court ruled unenforceable; and
  • allow a member of a licensed organization conducting bingo games to participate in the management of bingo games after being a member of the organization for six months instead of the current two years?

As you may know, many community service organizations are struggling to gain and maintain membership. This ballot measure allows a member to help in the management of bingo games after six months of membership rather than the now required two years. Of course, the decision of who participates in game management is up to the affected organization.

Also, the original amendment (1980) restricted advertising beyond the premises of the organization. Another portion of this amendment would remove that restriction.

A “yes” vote will amend the Missouri Constitution to remove language limiting bingo game advertising that a court ruled was unconstitutional and not enforceable.   This amendment would also allow a member of a licensed organization conducting bingo games to participate in the management of bingo games after being a member of the organization for six months, a reduction from two years.

A “no” vote will not amend the Missouri Constitution regarding bingo games.

State and local governmental entities estimate no costs or savings from this proposal.

Historical note: Prior to 1980, bingo games were illegal in the state of Missouri. In that year, the General Assembly referred a constitutional amendment to authorize religious, charitable, fraternal, service, and veteran organizations to conduct games of bingo. On the ballot as Amendment 3, voters approved the measure on November 4, 1980. Amendment 3 required that an organization’s bingo game managers be members of the organization for at least two years. The amendment also prohibited organizations from advertising bingo games, except on their own premises. Voters rejected making changes to the amendment in 1990 and 2000.

District Visit

Life House Youth Center Jennifier Massie-FadlerEarlier this week, Jennifier Massie-Fadler, Executive Director, and Stefan Wehmeyer, Program Director, of the Life House Youth Center in Sullivan gave me a great tour of their facility. Life House Youth Center is a non-for-profit center open to all children 10-17 free of charge.

Life House provides youth with a fun, structured, and safe place to spend time with their peers after school and in the summer.

For more info on the great work Life House accomplishes in our community, visit: https://www.lhcsullivan.org/

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

The Capitol Report | September 27th, 2018

Statewide Ballot Measures

This election, November 6th, the citizens of Missouri will have several legislative/constitutional issues to decide. As of 2018, citizens are required to file at least 100,126 valid signatures for initiated state statutes and veto referendums, and are required to file at least 160,199 valid signatures for initiated constitutional amendments. These signature requirements are the requirement if petitioners collect signatures in the smallest of the state’s congressional districts to satisfy the state’s distribution requirement. Collecting signatures in larger districts would result in a slightly larger signature requirement.

As Election Day approaches, I will recap the several statewide ballot measures approved to appear on the ballot this November. This week, I will begin with Amendments 2 and 3.

Amendment 2 – Missouri Amendment 2 is a marijuana legality change to the constitution. The Medical Marijuana and Veteran Healthcare Services Initiative, as it is titled, is on the ballot in Missouri as an initiated constitutional amendment.  Currently, Missouri has not legalized the use or possession or medical marijuana. Amendment 2 would legalize marijuana for medical purposes. The ballot initiative would allow state-licensed physicians to recommend marijuana use to patients with nine qualifying conditions and additional conditions with doctor’s approval. Patients would be allowed to grow six flowering plants in their homes or purchase processed marijuana.

Amendment 2 would also tax the sale of medical marijuana at 4 percent and allocate revenue from the tax toward providing healthcare services, job training, housing assistance, and other services for veterans. Amendment 2 would task the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services with overseeing and regulating the state’s medical marijuana program. The ballot initiative would authorize not less than 24 dispensaries in each of the state’s eight congressional districts, based on 2018 boundaries.

Amendment 3 – Missouri Amendment 3, the Medical Marijuana and Biomedical Research and Drug Development Institute Initiative, is on the ballot in Missouri as an initiated constitutional amendment. Amendment 3 would legalize marijuana for medical purposes. The ballot initiative would tax marijuana sales at 15 percent. Revenue from the sales tax would be used to establish and fund a Biomedical Research and Drug Development Institute, which would be tasked with researching cures for cancer and other diseases and overseeing the state’s medical marijuana program. Amendment 3 would also enact cultivation taxes on marijuana flowers ($9.25 per ounce) and on marijuana leaves ($2.75 per ounce).

The ballot initiative would allow state-licensed physicians to recommend marijuana use to patients with 10 qualifying conditions. The research institute would be empowered to add additional conditions to the list of qualifying conditions. Patients would be allowed to purchase not less than 3 ounces of dried marijuana or equivalent in 30-day period (more permitted with written certification from two independent physicians). The ballot initiative would authorize not less than two dispensaries per 20,000 residents in counties and cities

If you ever have questions, comments, or concerns, please call my office at 573-751-1688 or email me at: jason.chipman@house.mo.gov

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

 

 

Unemployment Rate

Missouri’s unemployment rate remains at an 18-year low, as the unemployment rate edged down another tenth of a point to 3.3 percent in August, while nonfarm payroll employment in the state grew by 1,000 jobs.  The monthly increase in private-sector employment was 2,700. Industries with job growth included Professional and Business Services (+4,000), Financial Activities (+1,100), and Leisure and Hospitality (+1,100).  These gains were partly offset by job decreases in Trade, Transportation and Utilities (-1,800); Manufacturing (-1,500); and Local Government (-1,600).

Over the past year, Missouri payroll employment has grown by 35,300 (+1.2 percent).  Most industry groups experienced employment growth over that period.  The largest categories of increase were in Professional and Business Services (+13,700, 3.6 percent); Private Education and Health Services (+12,100, 2.6 percent); and Leisure and Hospitality (+6,300, 2.1 percent).

Statewide Ballot Measures

This election, November 6th, the citizens of Missouri will have several legislative/constitutional issues to decide. As of 2018, citizens are required to file at least 100,126 valid signatures for initiated state statutes and veto referendums, and are required to file at least 160,199 valid signatures for initiated constitutional amendments. These signature requirements are the requirement if petitioners collect signatures in the smallest of the state’s congressional districts to satisfy the state’s distribution requirement. Collecting signatures in larger districts would result in a slightly larger signature requirement.

As Election Day approaches, I will recap the several statewide ballot measures approved to appear on the ballot this November. This week, I will begin with Amendments 2 and 3.

Amendment 2 – Missouri Amendment 2 is a marijuana legality change to the constitution. The Medical Marijuana and Veteran Healthcare Services Initiative, as it is titled, is on the ballot in Missouri as an initiated constitutional amendment.  Currently, Missouri has not legalized the use or possession or medical marijuana. Amendment 2 would legalize marijuana for medical purposes. The ballot initiative would allow state-licensed physicians to recommend marijuana use to patients with nine qualifying conditions and additional conditions with doctor’s approval. Patients would be allowed to grow six flowering plants in their homes or purchase processed marijuana.

Amendment 2 would also tax the sale of medical marijuana at 4 percent and allocate revenue from the tax toward providing healthcare services, job training, housing assistance, and other services for veterans. Amendment 2 would task the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services with overseeing and regulating the state’s medical marijuana program. The ballot initiative would authorize not less than 24 dispensaries in each of the state’s eight congressional districts, based on 2018 boundaries.

A “yes” vote supports this constitutional amendment to:

  • legalize marijuana for medical purposes;
  • tax marijuana sales at 4 percent; and
  • spend tax revenue on healthcare services for veterans.

A “no” vote opposes this constitutional amendment.

Amendment 3 – Missouri Amendment 3, the Medical Marijuana and Biomedical Research and Drug Development Institute Initiative, is on the ballot in Missouri as an initiated constitutional amendment. Amendment 3 would legalize marijuana for medical purposes. The ballot initiative would tax marijuana sales at 15 percent. Revenue from the sales tax would be used to establish and fund a Biomedical Research and Drug Development Institute, which would be tasked with researching cures for cancer and other diseases and overseeing the state’s medical marijuana program. Amendment 3 would also enact cultivation taxes on marijuana flowers ($9.25 per ounce) and on marijuana leaves ($2.75 per ounce).

The ballot initiative would allow state-licensed physicians to recommend marijuana use to patients with 10 qualifying conditions. The research institute would be empowered to add additional conditions to the list of qualifying conditions. Patients would be allowed to purchase not less than 3 ounces of dried marijuana or equivalent in 30-day period (more permitted with written certification from two independent physicians). The ballot initiative would authorize not less than two dispensaries per 20,000 residents in counties and cities.

A “yes” vote supports this constitutional amendment to:

  • legalize marijuana for medical purposes;
  • tax marijuana sales at 15 percent; and
  • spend tax revenue on a Biomedical Research and Drug Development Institute.

A “no” vote opposes this constitutional amendment.
District Visits

VernaBrand&RamonaStJamesCaringCenterVerna Brand, Board Member, and Ramona Rinehart, Executive Director, of the St. James Caring Center were kind enough to give me a tour of the their facilities and the new senior center. They are doing tremendous work, and I am grateful they are in our community.
gc-logo-fsEarlier this week, I worked with Carmen Schulze and Carrie Myers to tour Great Circle in St. James. They showed me their facilities and we discussed the recent progress that has been made and future improvement plans. I look forward to seeing how they continue to help those in need.

 

 

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov