The Capitol Report | June 21st, 2018

Earlier this week, Governor Mike Parson appointed Senator Mike Kehoe to the position of Lt. Governor to fill the vacancy left when Parson took over for former Governor Eric Grietens. Lt. Governor Kehoe said he plans to focus on the state’s infrastructure needs, among other issues, during his tenure.

In other news, I will continue to summarize Truly Agreed to and Finally Passed (TAFP) bills from this legislative session. All of these bills have been signed and delivered to the governor’s office. Bill review will be one of the first duties of the new governor.

HB 1504 – Allows the governing bodies or county planning commissions in Newton and McDonald counties to adopt ordinances regulating incompatible land uses and structures within any or all the unincorporated area extending up to 3,000 feet outward from the boundaries of any National Guard training center if the county has participated in the completion of a joint land use study associated with the training center.

HB 1516 – Authorizes MO HealthNet reimbursement for up to 20 visits per year for services provided to MO HealthNet participants by licensed chiropractic physicians practicing within their scope of practice.

HB 1517 – Requires the Attorney General and the Commissioner of Administration, by no later than September 30, 2018, and by the last day of each calendar month thereafter, to submit a report to the General Assembly detailing settlements and judgments paid in the previous month from the State Legal Expense Fund, including any payments from or deposits to the fund, as specified in the bill. In cases of legal expenses incurred by specified state departments, universities, and colleges, the required report is to be submitted by the legal counsel provided by the respective entity and by the designated keeper of that entity’s accounts.

HB 1531 – Provides that a private attorney retained by the state is not entitled to a fee, exclusive of costs and expenses, of more than a set percentage determined by the dollar amount recovered. The total fee payable to retained private attorneys in any matter subject to a contingency fee shall not exceed $10 million, exclusive of costs and expenses provided for in the contracts and actually incurred by the attorneys. The bill specifies that a contingency fee is payable only from money actually received under a judgment or settlement agreement and shall not be based on any amount attributable to a fine or civil penalty.

HB 1558 – Creates the offense of nonconsensual dissemination of private sexual images, which is a class D felony. The bill specifies certain exceptions to the offense. The bill also creates the offense of threatening the nonconsensual dissemination of private sexual images, which is a class E felony.

HB 1606 – Beginning in the 2019-20 school year, this bill requires schools to be in session for 1044 hours of pupil attendance, and eliminates the requirement that schools be in session for any minimum number of days.

If you ever have questions, comments, or concerns, please call my office at 573-751-1688 or email me at: jason.chipman@house.mo.gov

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

2018 Truly Agreed to and Finally Passed Bills

I will continue to summarize Truly Agreed to and Finally Passed (TAFP) bills from this legislative session. All of these bills have been signed and delivered to the governor’s office. Bill review will be one of the first duties of the new governor.

HB 1504 – Requires certain counties to adopt ordinances regulating land use around National Guard training centers

This bill allows the governing bodies or county planning commissions in Newton and McDonald counties to adopt ordinances regulating incompatible land uses and structures within any or all the unincorporated area extending up to 3,000 feet outward from the boundaries of any National Guard training center if the county has participated in the completion of a joint land use study associated with the training center.

HB 1516 – Specifies that licensed chiropractic physicians may treat and be reimbursed for conditions currently reimbursed under MO HealthNet

This bill authorizes MO HealthNet reimbursement for up to 20 visits per year for services provided to MO HealthNet participants by licensed chiropractic physicians practicing within their scope of practice.

HB 1517 – Requires the attorney general and the commissioner of administration to submit to the general assembly a monthly report of all settlements and judgments paid from the state legal expense fund

This bill requires the Attorney General and the Commissioner of Administration, by no later than September 30, 2018, and by the last day of each calendar month thereafter, to submit a report to the General Assembly detailing settlements and judgments paid in the previous month from the State Legal Expense Fund, including any payments from or deposits to the fund, as specified in the bill. In cases of legal expenses incurred by specified state departments, universities, and colleges, the required report is to be submitted by the legal counsel provided by the respective entity and by the designated keeper of that entity’s accounts.

HB 1531 – Modifies provisions relating to civil proceedings

This bill provides that a private attorney retained by the state is not entitled to a fee, exclusive of costs and expenses, of more than a set percentage determined by the dollar amount recovered. The total fee payable to retained private attorneys in any matter subject to a contingency fee shall not exceed $10 million, exclusive of costs and expenses provided for in the contracts and actually incurred by the attorneys. The bill specifies that a contingency fee is payable only from money actually received under a judgment or settlement agreement and shall not be based on any amount attributable to a fine or civil penalty.

This bill modifies the circumstances in which a party may be joined in a civil action. The bill clarifies that a plaintiff’s insured may be joined as a defendant and required to interplead when the plaintiff may be exposed to multiple claims. The term “plaintiff” includes an insurance company when the multiple claims exceed the total limits of applicable coverage. The bill further sets forth a procedure by which an insurer or risk management entity may timely deposit all applicable limits of coverage into court in an interpleader action, and will not be further liable for any amount in excess of its contractual limits of coverage so long as the insurer defends its insured from any further claim or lawsuit.

HB 1558 – Creates the offense of nonconsensual dissemination of private sexual images

This bill creates the offense of nonconsensual dissemination of private sexual images, which is a class D felony. A person commits such offense when he or she: intentionally disseminates an image of another person fitting criteria specified in the bill; obtains the image under circumstances in which a reasonable person would know or understand that the image was to remain private; and knows or should have known that the person in the image has not consented to the dissemination. The bill specifies certain exceptions to the offense. The bill also creates the offense of threatening the nonconsensual dissemination of private sexual images, which is a class E felony. A person commits the offense of threatening the nonconsensual dissemination of private sexual images if he or she gains or attempts to gain anything of value, or coerces or attempts to coerce another person to act or refrain from acting, by threatening to disseminate an image of another person, under the circumstances specified in the bill. This bill contains an emergency clause.

HB 1606 – Modifies provisions relating to elementary and secondary education

Beginning in the 2019-20 school year, this bill requires schools to be in session for 1044 hours of pupil attendance, and eliminates the requirement that schools be in session for any minimum number of days. The bill requires schools to post certain financial information online, including a searchable expenditure and revenue document or database detailing actual income, expenditures, and disbursements for the current calendar or fiscal year on its district or school website by September 1, 2019. A school is not required to post any confidential information, including any personal information regarding payroll.  This bill provides that if less than 25% of the public school student transportation funding formula is funded by the state, a school board may vote to reduce its allocation of foundation formula money going to professional development from a minimum of 1% to a minimum of 0.5%.

In addition, this bill provides students the opportunity to choose between the ACT WorkKeys assessment or the ACT assessment in any school year in which the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) or a school district directs an administration of the ACT assessment. This bill also requires the Governor to appoint a teacher representative to the State Board of Education (SBE). The teacher representative will not have the right to vote on any matter or be counted in establishing a quorum. The teacher representative is not allowed in a closed meeting.

District Visit

LittleShopOfComics
My whole family is excited about having a comic book store so close to home. We were happy to be a part of the ribbon cutting last week for the new Little Shop Of Comics in Cuba. If you get a chance, stop by and check them out.

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

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The Capitol Report | June 14th, 2018

Governor Calls for Fresh Start in Address

As the legislative special session came to a close on Monday night, the Missouri House and Senate convened for a joint session in the House Chamber to listen to an address from Gov. Mike Parson. The new governor, who was sworn into office Friday, June 1, delivered an address to lawmakers that focused on the importance of public service and the need to work together to create a better Missouri. As the governor said in his remarks, “We have witnessed politics at its worst and at its best. We have been divided, and we have been united. Missouri has risen to the occasion, as we always do.  Today is a time for a fresh start for our state and to recommit ourselves — we must work together for a better Missouri!”

Shortly after the governor completed his address, House Speaker Richardson issued a statement saying he looked forward to working with Gov. Parson in the months ahead. Richardson added, “I am especially pleased that Governor Parson acknowledged the recent historic legislative session and the substantive conservative policies the General Assembly passed.  I am confident the governor’s proven conservative track record means he will remain a strong advocate of views Missourians overwhelmingly voted for in 2016 for us to fight for in Jefferson City.”
With the special session now concluded, members of the House and Senate are next scheduled to convene for the annual Veto Session on Sept. 12.

HB 1465 – allows for community colleges potentially to be authorized to offer baccalaureate degrees to meet local workforce needs, and for other universities to collaborate with the University of Missouri to offer degrees in engineering, chiropractic, osteopathic medicine, and podiatry.

HB 1469 – Modifies provisions of the Missouri military code by changing the name of the “Missouri reserve military force” to the “Missouri state defense force”

HB 1484 – Allows persons who have, for at least six months, been a bona fide member of an organization licensed to conduct bingo to participate in the operation of a bingo game.

HB 1492 – Extends eligibility in the Show-Me Heroes program from one year to five years from discharge of deployment.

HB 1500 – Establishes guidelines for the future regulation of occupations and professions in the State of Missouri. The bill specifies that the state may not impose a substantial burden on an individual’s pursuit of his or her occupation or profession unless there is a reasonable interest for the state to protect the general welfare.

HB 1503 – Allows veteran-owned small businesses to participate in the Missouri Linked Deposit Program. An “eligible veteran-owned small business” is defined as any business owned by an honorably discharged veteran and Missouri resident who has agreed to locate his or her business in the state for at least three years and employs less than 100 employees, a majority of whom are Missouri residents.

If you ever have questions, comments, or concerns, please call my office at 573-751-1688 or email me at:
jason.chipman@house.mo.gov

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

Governor Parson Calls for a Fresh Start in Address to the Missouri General Assembly

As the legislative special session came to a close on Monday night, the Missouri House and Senate convened for a joint session in the House Chamber to listen to an address from Gov. Mike Parson. The new governor, who was sworn into office Friday, June 1, delivered an address to lawmakers that focused on the importance of public service and the need to work together to create a better Missouri.

As the governor said in his remarks, “We have witnessed politics at its worst and at its best. We have been divided, and we have been united. Missouri has risen to the occasion, as we always do.  Today is a time for a fresh start for our state and to recommit ourselves — we must work together for a better Missouri!”

During his remarks, Parson also stressed that his focus in office will be on serving the people of the state. “As we move forward, together, I pledge that I will spend every day working to make our state stronger and more prosperous,” said Parson. “I promise that the welfare of the people will be my guiding principle and sole consideration. And I will never forget – never forget – that public service is—first and foremost— about serving Missourians.”

Shortly after the governor completed his address, House Speaker Richardson issued a statement saying he looked forward to working with Gov. Parson in the months ahead. Richardson added, “I am especially pleased that Governor Parson acknowledged the recent historic legislative session and the substantive conservative policies the General Assembly passed.  I am confident the governor’s proven conservative track record means he will remain a strong advocate of views Missourians overwhelmingly voted for in 2016 for us to fight for in Jefferson City.”

With the special session now concluded, members of the House and Senate are next scheduled to convene for the annual Veto Session on Sept. 12.

2018 Truly Agreed to and Finally Passed Bills

HB 1465 – Modifies various provisions relating to degree offerings at public institutions of higher education

This bill allows the Coordinating Board for Higher Education to approve new degree programs offered by state institutions of higher education. Community colleges may be authorized to offer baccalaureate degrees to meet local workforce needs, and other universities may collaborate with the University of Missouri to offer degrees in engineering, chiropractic, osteopathic medicine, and podiatry. The West Plains Campus of Missouri State University and the State Technical College of Missouri may also offer baccalaureate degrees if authorized by the Coordinating Board. The University of Missouri remains the state’s only public research university and the only institution authorized to grant research doctorates and first-professional degrees including dentistry, law, medicine, optometry, pharmacy, and veterinary medicine. No state college or university may seek the land grant designation held by Lincoln University and the University of Missouri or the research designation currently held by the University of Missouri.

HB 1469 – Modifies provisions of the Missouri military code by changing the name of the “Missouri reserve military force” to the “Missouri state defense force”

This bill changes references to the “reserve military force” in the Missouri Military Code to the “state defense force.”

HB 1484 – Changes the laws regarding the requirements for the operation of a bingo game

This bill allows persons who have, for at least six months, been a bona fide member of an organization licensed to conduct bingo to participate in the operation of a bingo game. The Constitution currently requires at least two years of membership prior to

participation. This bill also removes the statutory restrictions on the advertisement of bingo. This bill will only become effective upon the passage of a Constitutional amendment.

HB 1492 – Changes the law regarding the Show-Me Heroes program

Currently, the spouses of active duty National Guard or reservists and active duty military personal, and returning National Guard troops and reservists can participate in the Department of Economic Development’s Show-Me Heroes Program for one year following discharge of deployment. This bill extends eligibility in the program to five years from discharge of deployment.

HB 1500 – Modifies provisions relating to the practice of cosmetology and barbering

This bill establishes guidelines for the future regulation of occupations and professions in the State of Missouri. The bill specifies that the state may not impose a substantial burden on an individual’s pursuit of his or her occupation or profession unless there is a reasonable interest for the state to protect the general welfare. If such interest exists, the regulation adopted by the state shall be the least restrictive type of occupational regulation consistent with the public interest to be protected. The bill states that all bills introduced in the General Assembly to regulate an occupation or profession shall be reviewed according to criteria set forth in the bill. Additionally, the bill requires that the Department of Insurance, Financial Institutions and Professional Registration, or any relevant regulatory agency, report and submit certain information to the General Assembly upon the filing of any bill that proposes a new or additional regulation of an occupation or profession.

HB 1503 – This bill changes the laws relating to military affairs

This bill allows veteran-owned small businesses to participate in the Missouri Linked Deposit Program. An “eligible veteran-owned small business” is defined as any business owned by an honorably discharged veteran and Missouri resident who has agreed to locate his or her business in the state for at least three years and employs less than 100 employees, a majority of whom are Missouri residents. In considering which small businesses should receive reduced-rate loans through the Linked Deposit Program, a lending institution must give priority to those owned by veterans. Any veteran who receives a small business loan through the Linked Deposit Program must also complete a boots-to-business program approved by the Department of Economic Development and be assigned a mentor for 365 days following the loan approval date. The owner and his or her mentor must meet at least once every 90 days.

District Visits

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Last Friday, I enjoyed meeting with and presenting House resolutions to three Washington, D.C. Youth Tour delegates for Crawford Electric Cooperative. The delegates are (L to R) Faith Bair of Steelville High School, Faith Skaggs of Bourbon High School, and Ella Wright of Ownesville High School.

The delegates get an all-expense-paid trip to Washington, D.C. for the 2018 Electric Cooperative Youth Tour. During the tour, the students will experience unique leadership development opportunities, meet legislators, and explore some of our country’s most historic sites and monuments.

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Congratulations to Crawford County for becoming certified work ready by the Missouri Department of Economic Development. A big thank you to Dr. Sean Siebert and Sheriff Darin Layman for getting us over the finish line.

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

The Capitol Report | June 7th, 2018

Upcoming Joint Session

Gov. Mike Parson has officially taken over as chief executive of the state. In one of his first official acts as governor, Gov. Parson will address a joint session of the General Assembly this coming Monday, June 11 at the State Capitol to share his administration’s vision for Missouri.

In other news, I will continue to summarize Truly Agreed to and Finally Passed (TAFP) bills from this legislative session. All of these bills have been signed and delivered to the governor’s office. Bill review will be one of the first duties of the new governor.

HB 1413 – The bill provides that no sum shall be withheld from a public employee’s earnings to pay dues or other fees to a public labor organization without annual authorization. Labor organizations are required to maintain financial records substantially similar to federal law, and must make the records available to employees in a searchable electronic format.

HB 1415 – The bill authorizes schools to rely on technical coursework and skills assessments developed for industry-recognized certificates and credentials when developing career and technical education pathways for their students. This bill establishes the “Career Readiness Course Task Force” to study the possibility of offering a middle school career readiness course and the members shall represent the geographic diversity of the state, as specified in the bill.

HB 1428 – This bill sets a 60-day time limit for the Governor to fill a vacancy in the office of county commissioner with the advice and consent of the Senate. The vacancies filled by appointment will be held by the appointee for the remainder of the term. The bill does not apply to any county that has adopted a charter for its own government under Article VI, Section 18 of the Missouri Constitution.

HB 1446 – (1) Requires the Department of Revenue to issue an annual report listing sales and use taxes authorized by state law and collected by the department; (2) Expands the existing exception for small cities, towns, and villages, which allows candidates for election to assume office without holding an election if a particular election is uncontested and the number of candidates available equal the number of open positions, from cities, towns, or villages with 1,000 or less persons to those with 2,000 or less persons; among other provisions.

HB 1456 –  The bill provides appointment procedures and criteria for county emergency dispatching service boards when the board is meant to consolidate central dispatching services in other political subdivisions that have contracted for such service.

HB 1460 – Beginning July 1, 2019, this bill increases the fuel tax from $.17 per gallon to $.27 per gallon in $.025 increments over four years. Beginning July 1, 2022, the tax rate of $.27 applies. The additional revenue generated by the tax increase is used for the actual costs of the State Highway Patrol, subject to appropriation. The bill contains a referendum clause and the provisions of this bill will become effective upon voter approval.

HB 1461 –  This bill makes changes to the Address Confidentiality Program, which authorizes the use of a designated address for victims of a crime. The bill expands the program to victims of any crime who fear for their safety.

If you ever have questions, comments, or concerns, please call my office at
573-751-1688 or email me at:
jason.chipman@house.mo.gov

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

2018 Truly Agreed to and Finally Passed Bills

HB 1413 – Requires authorization for certain labor unions to use dues and fees to make political contributions and requires consent for withholding earnings from paychecks

The bill provides that no sum shall be withheld from a public employee’s earnings to pay dues or other fees to a public labor

organization without annual authorization. Labor organizations are required to maintain financial records substantially similar to federal law, and must make the records available to employees in a searchable electronic format.

HB 1415 – Allows teachers to count hours spent in externships with local businesses as professional development hours

The bill authorizes schools to rely on technical coursework and skills assessments developed for industry-recognized certificates and credentials when developing career and technical education pathways for their students (Section 162.1115). This bill establishes the “Career Readiness Course Task Force” to study the possibility of offering a middle school career readiness course and the members shall represent the geographic diversity of the state, as specified in the bill. The task force shall report it findings and recommendations by December 1, 2019.

HB 1428 – Allows the county commission of noncharter counties to appoint persons to vacated county elected offices.

This bill sets a 60-day time limit for the Governor to fill a vacancy in the office of county commissioner with the advice and consent of the Senate. The vacancies filled by appointment will be held by the appointee for the remainder of the term. The bill does not apply to any county that has adopted a charter for its own government under Article VI, Section 18 of the Missouri Constitution.

The bill also requires the county commission in all noncharter counties to fill by appointment, within 14 days, a vacancy in a county elected office to serve until the Governor makes an appointment or until the vacancy is filled by operation of another provision of law. In counties with only two county commissioners, when there is the absence of an agreement, the presiding judge of the circuit court will make the appointment. The offices of associate circuit judge, circuit judge, circuit clerk, prosecuting attorney, and circuit attorney are excluded from this provision.

HB 1446 – Modifies provisions relating to non-election successions in certain political subdivisions

This bill changes elections laws. In its main provisions, the bill:

(1) Requires the Department of Revenue to issue an annual report listing sales and use taxes authorized by state law and collected by the department; (2) Expands the existing exception for small cities, towns, and villages, which allows candidates for election to assume office without holding an election if a particular election is uncontested and the number of candidates available equal the number of open positions, from cities, towns, or villages with 1,000 or less persons to those with 2,000 or less persons; (3) Requires the Secretary of State to furnish specified absentee ballot information upon request of a duly authorized campaign or political party committee representative. Fees for copying may be charged and will not exceed public record copying charges; This provision has an emergency clause.

HB 1456 – Changes the laws regarding 911 emergency communication services

The bill provides appointment procedures and criteria for county emergency dispatching service boards when the board is meant to consolidate central dispatching services in other political subdivisions that have contracted for such service. The terms of office for existing board members that consolidate with other boards shall end 30 days after the initial members of the newly consolidated board are appointed.

HB 1460 – Authorizes a tax deduction for any prize or award won by an Olympic medalist and fuel tax increases

Beginning July 1, 2019, this bill increases the fuel tax from $.17 per gallon to $.27 per gallon in $.025 increments over four years. Beginning July 1, 2022, the tax rate of $.27 applies. The additional revenue generated by the tax increase is used for the actual costs of the State Highway Patrol, subject to appropriation. In addition, the bill authorizes the Department of Agriculture to tax all types of fuel at a substantially equivalent rate by implementing a rule by January 1, 2026. This bill authorizes the “Olympic Dream Freedom Act” which allows a state individual income tax deduction for the value of any prize or award won by a taxpayer in athletic competition in the Olympic, Paralympic, or Special Olympic Games. The bill creates the “Emergency State Freight Bottleneck Fund” which is dedicated, subject to appropriation, only to road projects with criteria for such projects specified in the bill. The bill contains a referendum clause and the provisions of this bill will become effective upon voter approval.

HB 1461 – Modifies provisions relating to the Address Confidentiality Program

This bill makes changes to the Address Confidentiality Program, which authorizes the use of a designated address for victims of a crime. The bill expands the program to victims of any crime who fear for their safety. The bill also applies the program to other individuals living with the victim. The bill specifies that if a parent is participating in the program, a court order releasing information on a minor child in a custody case shall not release the parent’s address. Additionally, if a parent wishes to relocate a child who is under his or her custody, a parent in the program may provide his or her information under seal to the court for in camera review. The bill specifies that an applicant may complete his or her own renewal in the program, and does not need to use an application assistant. A participant in the program may be removed if he or she moves outside of Missouri.

Unclaimed Property

Missouri State Treasurer Eric Schmitt has informed my office that he currently holds $1,608,637.46 in unclaimed property belonging to approximately 16,697 account owners within the 120th District. This money is sitting in holding awaiting the rightful owners to come forward.

Therefore, I encourage you to search for and claim your property free of charge at: www.ShowMeMoney.com

Banks, businesses, and insurance companies turn over Unclaimed Property to the Treasurer after accounts have been inactive and owners cannot be successfully contacted for a statutorily defined period of time, generally five years.

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

The Capitol Report | May 31st, 2018

On Tuesday, Missouri Governor Eric Grietens resigned from office effective Friday, June 1st. As a result, the Special Investigative Committee on Oversight will wrap up its work, and there will no longer be a need for members of the House to consider any potential recommendations from the committee. Once the Governor departs at 5 PM on Friday, Lt. Gov. Mike Parson will then take over as chief executive of the state.

Following the governor’s announcement, House Speaker Todd Richardson, Speaker Pro Tem Elijah Haahr, and Majority Floor Leader Rob Vescovo released a statement saying, “We believe the governor has put the best interest of Missourians first today by choosing to resign. The past few months have been difficult for everyone involved, including the governor and his family…As public servants, our solemn duty is to put the best interests of the people of this great state first in every decision we make. The governor’s decision today honors that duty and allows Missouri to move forward toward a better tomorrow.”

In other news, as promised, I will continue to summarize Truly Agreed to and Finally Passed (TAFP) bills from this legislative session. I will begin this week’s recap with more House bills.

HB 1288 – The bill clarifies that for purposes of the credit a child advocacy center includes an association based in Missouri, an association affiliated with a national association, and an association organized to provide support to the regional assessment centers listed in Section 210.001.2, RSMo.

HB 1291 – This bill, among other provisions, allows the governing bodies of certain counties to adopt ordinances regulating incompatible land uses and structures, as defined in the bill, within an unincorporated area surrounding the boundaries of any National Guard training center, if the county has participated in the completion of a joint land use study for the training center.

HB 1350 – Currently, in-home service providers and home health agencies are guilty of a class A misdemeanor if they employ a person to provide services to patients who is listed on any of the background checklists in the Family Care Safety Registry. This bill repeals that provision and provides that such entities shall be guilty of a class A misdemeanor if they employ a person who is guilty or has pleaded guilty or nolo contendere to certain offenses, is on the Department of Health and Senior Services’ employee disqualification list or the Department of Mental Health’s employee disqualification registry, or has a finding on the child abuse and neglect registry.

HB 1355 – This bill establishes that any law enforcement agency in the state may supplement its workforce as necessary with qualified retired peace officers when a disaster or emergency has been declared by the Governor or when there is a national emergency, and those officers shall serve as volunteers.

HB 1364 – Currently, the petroleum storage tank insurance fund is due to expire on December 31, 2020. The bill extends the expiration date to December 31, 2025. The bill also establishes the “Task Force on the Petroleum Storage Tank Insurance Fund.”

HB 1388 – This bill adds amateur kickboxing and amateur mixed martial arts to the list of contests the Division of Professional Registration has the authority to regulate.

If you ever have questions, comments, or concerns, please call my office at
573-751-1688 or email me at:
jason.chipman@house.mo.gov

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

2018 Truly Agreed to and Finally Passed Bills

HB 1288 – Extends the sunset for the Champion for Children Tax Credit and modifies provisions of a tax credit for donations to maternity homes

The bill clarifies that for purposes of the credit a child advocacy center includes an association based in Missouri, an association affiliated with a national association, and an association organized to provide support to the regional assessment centers listed in Section 210.001.2, RSMo. The cumulative amount of tax credits redeemed cannot exceed $1.5 million in any tax year. Tax credits cannot be transferred or sold. This bill also removes the expiration of June 30, 2020 from the tax credit for donations to maternity homes and the expiration date of December 31, 2019 from the tax credit for donations to pregnancy resource centers, increases the cap for each credit to $3.5 million beginning January 1, 2019, and states that these tax credits cannot be transferred or sold. These provisions sunset on December 31 six years after the effective date unless reauthorized.

HB 1291 – Revises the definition of counties exempt from certain requirements of the county special road and bridge tax

This bill, among other provisions, allows the governing bodies of certain counties to adopt ordinances regulating incompatible land uses and structures, as defined in the bill, within an unincorporated area surrounding the boundaries of any National Guard training center, if the county has participated in the completion of a joint land use study for the training center.

HB 1350 – Modifies provisions relating to criminal history records

Currently, in-home service providers and home health agencies are guilty of a class A misdemeanor if they employ a person to provide services to patients who is listed on any of the background checklists in the Family Care Safety Registry. This bill repeals

that provision and provides that such entities shall be guilty of a class A misdemeanor if they employ a person who is guilty or has pleaded guilty or nolo contendere to certain offenses, is on the Department of Health and Senior Services’ employee disqualification list or the Department of Mental Health’s employee disqualification registry, or has a finding on the child abuse and neglect registry. Additionally, among other changes, this bill states that no state or federal financial assistance shall be available to pay for personal care assistance services if the personal care attendant has not undergone this background check process or if the personal care attendant has a disqualifying finding under this bill.

HB 1355 – Allows retired police officers to return to work when a disaster or emergency has been proclaimed by the governor or there is a national disaster

This bill establishes that any law enforcement agency in the state may supplement its workforce as necessary with qualified retired peace officers when a disaster or emergency has been declared by the Governor or when there is a national emergency, and those officers shall serve as volunteers. Retirees assisting law enforcement agencies under these circumstances shall be in compliance with the annual firearms training and qualification standards, established by the Department of Public Safety, for retired law enforcement officers carrying concealed firearms. Any compensation awarded to retirees for service under this bill shall be paid by the law enforcement agency the retired officer is assisting.

HB 1364 – Modifies provisions relating to hazardous waste fees paid to the Missouri Emergency Response Commission

Currently, the petroleum storage tank insurance fund is due to expire on December 31, 2020. The bill extends the expiration date to December 31, 2025. The bill also establishes the “Task Force on the Petroleum Storage Tank Insurance Fund.” The task force shall be composed of eight members, with three being from the House of Representatives and appointed by the Speaker of the House and the Minority Floor Leader, three from the Senate, and two industry stakeholders. The task force shall conduct research and compile a report, by December 31, 2018, on certain topics relating to the petroleum storage tank insurance fund (Sections 319.129 and 319.140, RSMo). Allows the Director of the Department of Agriculture to waive certain testing standards for fuel in emergency situations so long as the waiver applies equally and uniformly to suppliers and distributors

HB 1388 – Modifies provisions relating to certain sports contests

This bill adds amateur kickboxing and amateur mixed martial arts to the list of contests the Division of Professional Registration, within the Department of Insurance, Financial Institutions and Professional Registration has the authority to regulate. The bill requires that all contestants, other than amateur kickboxing contestants, be at least 18 years old and that all promoters provide a surety bond or irrevocable letter of credit before receiving a license. The bill also prohibits and restricts the use of certain strikes in amateur mixed martial arts. The bill removes the requirement that announcers and managers of professional boxing, sparring, professional wrestling, professional kickboxing, and professional full-contact karate be licensed by the division.

Unclaimed Property

Missouri State Treasurer Eric Schmitt has informed my office that he currently holds $1,608,637.46 in unclaimed property belonging to approximately 16,697 account owners within the 120th District. This money is sitting in holding awaiting the rightful owners to come forward.

Therefore, I encourage you to search for and claim your property free of charge at: www.ShowMeMoney.com

Banks, businesses, and insurance companies turn over Unclaimed Property to the Treasurer after accounts have been inactive and owners cannot be successfully contacted for a statutorily defined period of time, generally five years.

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

The Capitol Report | May 24th, 2018

Several Bills Now Set to Become Law

Last week marked the end of a very productive legislative session. The regular session came to a close with the General Assembly having Truly Agreed to and Finally Passed (TAFP) more than 145 bills. These bills are now set to become law upon the governor’s signature. The bills approved this year cover a variety of topics including making real improvements for the people of Missouri by lowering taxes for working families, cutting bureaucratic red tape, providing expanded educational opportunities to young people, supporting the state’s veterans, and protecting victims of human trafficking and domestic abuse. Starting this week, and for the next several weeks, I will share these bills with you, along with updates concerning the special session.

HB 1246 – Requires the Department of Public Safety to develop human trafficking hotline posters

HB 1250 – Establishes the Missouri Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act, which allows fiduciaries to access electronic records of the account holder

HB 1252 – Changes the law regarding low-dose mammography screening by adding digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis to the definition of low-dose mammography screening and beginning January 1, 2019, requires reimbursement rates to accurately reflect the resource costs specific to each modality

HB 1268 – Allows the Missouri Dental Board to issue dental faculty permits to individuals who are employed by accredited dental schools, colleges, or programs in Missouri

HB 1286 – Modifies provisions of law relating to the detonation of explosives and actions for private nuisances brought against certain permit holders by increasing the authorized fee for explosives use from $2 to $7.5 per ton

Shortly after the regular session concluded on the evening of Friday, May 18, members returned to the House Chamber to officially convene a special session. The legislature called itself back to consider the findings and recommendations of the House Special Investigative Committee on Oversight. On Tuesday, May 22, the committee took up and passed a resolution that would create the procedural framework for the session. The resolution incorporates some of the suggestions put forward by the governor’s attorneys. It does not include the proposed timeline. The resolution will now move to the House floor for discussion and approval.

In the meantime, the investigative committee will continue to meet to review testimony and documents. The committee will also take testimony from other parties who have been subpoenaed to appear before the committee. The committee will continue to meet until it is ready to put forth its recommendations for the full House of Representatives to consider.

If you ever have questions, comments, or concerns, please call my office at
573-751-1688 or email me at:
jason.chipman@house.mo.gov

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

 

Special Session Begins

Shortly after the regular session concluded on the evening of Friday, May 18, members returned to the House Chamber to officially convene a special session. The legislature called itself back to consider the findings and recommendations of the House Special Investigative Committee on Oversight.

The bulk of the work that will take place in the special session for the first few weeks will occur in the committee, which continues its efforts to conduct a fair, thorough, and timely investigation. Attorneys from the governor’s office previously met with the committee to suggest certain rules for the special session process. They also put forward a suggested timeline for how the special session should progress.

On Tuesday, May 22, the committee took up and passed a resolution that would create the procedural framework for the session. The resolution incorporates some of the suggestions put forward by the governor’s attorneys. It does not include the proposed timeline. The resolution will now move to the House floor for discussion and approval.

In the meantime, the investigative committee will continue to meet to review testimony and documents. The committee will also take testimony from other parties who have been subpoenaed to appear before the committee. The committee will continue to meet until it is ready to put forth its recommendations for the full House of Representatives to consider.

2018 Truly Agreed to and Finally Passed Bills

HB 1246 – Requires the Department of Public Safety to develop human trafficking hotline posters.

HB 1246 requires various establishments, specified in the bill, to display a poster that provides information regarding human trafficking, including what it is and what resources victims have for getting help, in a conspicuous place near the entrance of the establishment, starting March 1, 2019. Any establishment required to display the poster that fails to do so will be subject to the penalty provisions of this bill.

HB 1250 – Establishes the Missouri Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act, which allows fiduciaries to access electronic records of the account holder.

This bill specifies how a health savings account may be created. Currently, a trustee of a trust consisting of trust property having a total value less than $100,000 may, after notice to qualified beneficiaries, terminate the trust if the trustee concludes that the value of the trust property is insufficient to justify the cost of administration. The bill increases the dollar amount to less than $250,000.

HB 1252 – Changes the law regarding low-dose mammography screening

This bill adds digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis to the definition of low-dose mammography screening and beginning January 1, 2019, requires reimbursement rates to accurately reflect the resource costs specific to each modality, including any increased resource cost of breast tomosynthesis. Currently, insurance coverage is required for mammograms every two years for women age 40 to 49, unless a physician recommends more frequently and a mammogram every year for women age 50 and over. This bill modifies coverage for mammograms to every year for women age 40 and over.

HB 1268 – Allows the Missouri Dental Board to issue dental faculty permits to individuals who are employed by accredited dental schools, colleges, or programs in Missouri.

HB 1268 creates a dental faculty permit system to be implemented and enforced by the Missouri Dental Board. The bill authorizes the holder of a dental faculty permit to practice dentistry without a Missouri license but only within the course of teaching as part of an accredited dental school program. The holder of a dental faculty permit will not be able to receive any fee or compensation for the practice of dentistry except salary or benefits received as part of his or her employment with the Missouri dental school, college, or program.

HB 1286 – Modifies provisions of law relating to the detonation of explosives and actions for private nuisances brought against certain permit holders.

Currently, the authorized fee for explosives use cannot exceed $2 per ton. This bill increases the limit to $7.50 per ton. However, the fee established by rule cannot exceed the cost of administering the Missouri Blasting Safety Act. The bill clarifies that the fee does not apply to any person, company, or entity regulated by the Department of Natural Resources under the Surface Coal Mining Law and 10 CSR 40-3.160 (Section 319.318, RSMo).

Unclaimed Property

Missouri State Treasurer Eric Schmitt has informed my office that he currently holds $1,608,637.46 in unclaimed property belonging to approximately 16,697 account owners within the 120th District. This money is sitting in holding awaiting the rightful owners to come forward.

Therefore, I encourage you to search for and claim your property free of charge at: www.ShowMeMoney.com

Banks, businesses, and insurance companies turn over Unclaimed Property to the Treasurer after accounts have been inactive and owners cannot be successfully contacted for a statutorily defined period of time, generally five years.

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

The Capitol Report | May 18th, 2018

General Assembly Concludes Successful Session

The members of the Missouri House and Senate finished up a productive legislative session Friday evening as they gave final approval to several important measures. The regular session came to a close with the General Assembly giving final passage to more than 145 bills. The number represents an increase from the previous session when the legislature pushed 76 bills across the legislative finish line. The bills approved this year make substantive improvements for the people of Missouri by lowering taxes for working families, cutting bureaucratic red tape, providing expanded educational opportunities to young people, supporting the state’s veterans, and protecting victims of human trafficking and domestic abuse.

In addition to the policy initiatives adopted by the General Assembly, one of the biggest accomplishments of the 2018 session is a fiscally responsible state spending plan that makes a record level of investment in K-12 education. The spending plan approved by lawmakers fully funds the Foundation Formula for two consecutive years for the first time in state history. The spending plan also reverses cuts to higher education proposed by the governor. The restored funding is part of an agreement with the state’s colleges and universities that will keep tuition increases in check so that higher education remains affordable for Missouri families.

The fiscally responsible $28.3 billion spending plan approved by the legislature also holds welfare spending in check, and includes a budget reserve of $100 million to allow for emergency spending needs. Additionally, the budget approved by the House and Senate increases the level of transparency and accountability for the use of taxpayer dollars. The budget plan breaks down spending for the state’s legal expense fund, and improves transparency for spending within the state’s conservation department, as well for dollars allocated to home-delivered meals.

Missouri State Treasurer Eric Schmitt has informed my office that he currently holds $1,608,637.46 in unclaimed property belonging to approximately 16,697 account owners within the 120th District. This money is sitting in holding awaiting the rightful owners to come forward.

Therefore, I encourage you to search for and claim your property free of charge at: www.ShowMeMoney.com

Banks, businesses, and insurance companies turn over Unclaimed Property to the Treasurer after accounts have been inactive and owners cannot be successfully contacted for a statutorily defined period of time, generally five years.

If you ever have questions, comments, or concerns, please call my office at
573-751-1688 or email me at:
jason.chipman@house.mo.gov

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

 

General Assembly Concludes Successful Session

The members of the Missouri House and Senate finished up a productive legislative session Friday evening as they gave final approval to several important measures. The regular session came to a close with the General Assembly giving final passage to more than 145 bills. The number represents an increase from the previous session when the legislature pushed 76 bills across the legislative finish line. The bills approved this year make substantive improvements for the people of Missouri by lowering taxes for working families, cutting bureaucratic red tape, providing expanded educational opportunities to young people, supporting the state’s veterans, and protecting victims of human trafficking and domestic abuse.

Fiscally Responsible State Spending Plan with a Record Investment in Education

In addition to the policy initiatives adopted by the General Assembly, one of the biggest accomplishments of the 2018 session is a fiscally responsible state spending plan that makes a record level of investment in K-12 education. The spending plan approved by lawmakers fully funds the Foundation Formula for two consecutive years for the first time in state history. The spending plan also reverses cuts to higher education proposed by the governor. The restored funding is part of an agreement with the state’s colleges and universities that will keep tuition increases in check so that higher education remains affordable for Missouri families.

The fiscally responsible $28.3 billion spending plan approved by the legislature also holds welfare spending in check, and includes a budget reserve of $100 million to allow for emergency spending needs. Additionally, the budget approved by the House and Senate increases the level of transparency and accountability for the use of taxpayer dollars. The budget plan breaks down spending for the state’s legal expense fund, and improves transparency for spending within the state’s conservation department, as well for dollars allocated to home-delivered meals.

2018 Legislative Accomplishments

  • Working Family Tax Relief (HB 2540) – Missouri families will keep more of their paychecks under a tax cut approved by the General Assembly this session. The bill will provide Missourians with the largest single year income tax cut in the state’s history. The bill reduces the existing individual income tax rate from 5.9 percent to 5.5 percent. Additional triggers based upon revenue growth in the state will eventually lower the individual tax income rate to 5.1 percent, putting Missouri among the top states for lowest state income taxes.
  • Corporate Tax Reform (SB 884) – In an effort to make Missouri even more attractive to job creators, the legislature has approved a bill that will make Missouri’s corporate income tax the second lowest in the nation. The legislation will lower the corporate income tax rate from 6.25 percent to 4 percent in 2020. The bill is designed to be revenue neutral by closing loopholes in the current corporate tax structure. The legislation will also require all corporations to use a single-sales factor income allocation method, which will encourage investment and job creation in the state. The measure is meant to update the state’s outdated and complex corporate income tax code, and to create the best environment to drive economic development in Missouri.
  • Uniform Small Wireless Deployment Act (HB 1991) – The House and Senate worked together this session to approve legislation meant to bring Missouri’s wireless technology into the 21st The bill will allow “small cell” facilities to be deployed statewide so that the next generation of wireless technology can deliver faster and more efficient service. The legislation is designed to balance the needs of municipalities to manage the right-of-way in their communities with the need for wireless carriers to deploy this new technology. The bill is expected to create more than 20,000 jobs and attract $2 billion in capital investment leading to nearly $4 billion in economic growth over the next few years.
  • Grid Modernization and Rate Stabilization (SB 564) – The General Assembly has approved legislation that is meant to update the state’s utility infrastructure and ensure any benefits Missouri’s electric utilities have received from the federal tax cut are refunded to customers in the form of rate cuts within 90 days of the bill being signed into law. For Ameren Missouri customers, that equates approximately $133 million in savings, which will result in a 4.8 percent cut in electric rates. Because utility rates for Missourians have increased at a rate four times faster than the national average, the bill will implement customer-friendly rate caps and create stability for the future costs of electricity. The bill will allow the state’s biggest electricity companies to make improvements to their infrastructure with the more consistent rate increases. The legislation will lead to more than $1 billion in new investment and 3,000 new jobs in Missouri.
  • Expanding Rural Broadband (HB 1880) – Legislation approved during the 2018 session declares that the General Assembly believes expanding and accelerating access to high-speed broadband communications services is in the best interests of citizens. In recognition of this capital intensive deployment, the General Assembly encourages rural electric cooperatives to enter into agreements or contracts with certain entities set forth in this act. Such agreements may provide for the non-exclusive use of rural electric cooperative infrastructure and easements for the deployment of such services. The bill also modifies provisions relating to broadband communications services provided by rural electric cooperatives. Currently, rural electric cooperatives have certain powers, including the power to construct electric transmission and distribution lines or systems. Under the bill, such “electric transmission and distribution lines or systems” would be defined to include copper and fiber optic cable, facilities, as well as technology that carries light signals and data beyond that necessary for the transmission and distribution of electricity.
  • Rural Broadband Development (HB 1872) – The General Assembly approved a bill this year to help expand broadband internet service throughout the state. The bill establishes a program to award grants to applicants who seek to expand access to broadband internet service in unserved and underserved areas of the state. The program will be administered by the department of economic development. The legislation is meant to address the 61 percent of rural Missourians, representing more than one million individuals, who do not have access to reliable broadband services.
  • Preventing Overregulation (HB 1500) – A bill approved in 2018 will ensure government engages in the licensing and regulation of occupations and professions only when it is necessary to protect the welfare of the public. If the need exists, the regulation adopted by the state would need to be the least restrictive type of occupational regulation consistent with the public interest to be protected. The bill would also establish a heightened level of review with specific criteria for all legislation that would seek to license an occupation or profession for the first time or to substantially expand the scope of a current professional license.
  • Funding Road and Bridge Projects and Supporting the Highway Patrol (HB 1460) – Under legislation approved this session, voters will have the opportunity to decide if the state’s tax on fuel should be increased to provide a dedicated funding source for the state highway patrol, which will free up funding for Missouri’s roads and bridges. If approved by voters in November, the measure would gradually phase in a fuel tax increase of up to 10 cents per gallon by raising the tax by 2.5 cents a year for four years beginning July 2019. The bill is expected to raise at least $288 million annually for the State Road Fund to provide funding of Missouri state law enforcement, and $123 million annually to local governments for road construction and maintenance.
  • Fighting Human Trafficking (HB 1246) – Legislation approved by the General Assembly addresses the growing problem of human trafficking. The state is currently ranked 20th in reported human trafficking cases according to the National Human Trafficking Resource Center. Lawmakers built on past efforts to address the trafficking problem by passing legislation that will make Missourians better aware of the resources available to assist victims of trafficking. The bill requires the Department of Public Safety to develop a poster to promote the use of the National Human Trafficking Resource Center Hotline. The posters will be displayed at common areas where human trafficking can occur such as hotels or motels that have been cited for prostitution, and train and bus stations.
  • Treatment Courts (HB 2562) – The Missouri General Assembly gave final approval to a bill meant to improve the quality and consistency of treatment courts throughout Missouri. The bill will establish treatment court divisions, which include, but are not limited to, Adult Treatment Court, Driving While Intoxicated (DWI) Court, Family Treatment Court, Juvenile Treatment Court, and Veterans Treatment Court. The legislation will give local courts the authority and flexibility to set their own policies for treatment courts. The bill specifies that the Treatment Courts Coordinating Commission will establish standards and practices for the treatment courts.
  • Developing Missouri’s Workforce (HB 1465) – The legislature approved a measure this year to help ensure Missouri’s system of higher education is working to meet the state’s workforce and education needs. The bill will give institutions greater flexibility to offer degrees that meet the needs of their local communities and businesses. The legislation will in effect allow community colleges to offer four-year baccalaureate degrees in certain programs. The bill is meant to address the lack of skilled workers in certain fields in various parts of the state. It allows a community college to apply to the Coordinating Board of Higher Education to offer a four-year degree in a field that is underemployed. Community colleges will need to meet several standards in order to be approved and will need to show there are no other available options like collaborating with a four-year university.
  • STEM Career Awareness (SBs 894 & 921) – Legislation approved this year requires the state Department of Economic Development to establish the STEM Career Awareness Program to increase awareness of careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics for students in grades six through eight. The program will involve online-based curriculum that would raise awareness of more than eighty different careers and technologies, and would be organized around the concept of solving societal or human-centered problems. The bill will require the department to have the program in place by the 2019-20 school year. The bill also requires the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to develop a high school graduation policy that allows a student to fulfill a unit of academic credit with a district-approved computer science course for any math, science, or practical arts unit required for high school graduation.
  • Missouri Course Access and Virtual School Program (HB 1606 and SBs 603, 576 & 898) – Missouri students will soon have expanded access to the courses they need to further their education. The Missouri General Assembly approved legislation this session that would create the Missouri Course Access Program to expand the state’s virtual school offerings to all K-12 students. The bill expands the existing Missouri Virtual Instruction Program (MOVIP), which was established in 2007 to offer online courses to public, private, and home-school students. The program allows students to take advanced courses that are not currently offered by their local school districts. The bill requires the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to review the online courses to ensure they meet state standards.
  • Government Worker Protection Act (HB 1413) – A piece of legislation approved by the General Assembly will provide additional protections to government workers and make public unions more accountable. The bill would not apply to police officers, firefighters, corrections workers and other public emergency personnel. One part of the bill commonly referred to as “paycheck protection” would give workers the freedom to decide whether they want to opt in each year to pay dues and support political activity. The bill would also ensure public union members have a say in who represents them by requiring efficient and cost-effective elections every three years. The bill would also limit contracts to three years and require public unions to meet the same financial transparency standards as private sector unions.
  • Prevailing Wage Reform (HBs 1729, 1621 & 1436) – The legislature approved legislation that would reform the state’s prevailing wage law to ensure taxpayers are getting better value when their tax dollars are spent on public works projects. The bill modifies the prevailing wage hourly rate so that if fewer than 1,000 hours are reported, workers will be paid the public works minimum wage, which is based on the actual county average wage for all workers reported by the Department of Labor.  If more than 1,000 hours are reported, the workers will be paid the prevailing wage rate, which will be a weighted average wage. The bill will also exempt projects under $75,000 from the prevailing wage law. The legislation is meant to save colleges, schools, counties, and cities millions and stimulate more building by making taxpayer dollars go further.
  • Supporting Veterans (SB 573) – A wide-ranging piece of legislation approved by the General Assembly will provide additional support to members of the National Guard and the state’s veterans. The bill will allow members of the National Guard or reserve components of the Armed Forces of the United States to deduct their military income from their Missouri adjusted gross income to determine their Missouri taxable income. The bill will also allow private nonpublic employers to grant preference to a veteran, the spouse of a disabled veteran with a service-connected disability, or a surviving spouse of a deceased veteran, when hiring and promoting employees. The goal of the change is to make it clear that private businesses can give preferential hiring treatment to veterans in the same way that both the state and federal government do. Another provision of the bill will require all state buildings to display the POW/MIA flag. Other provisions of the bill will allow veteran-owned businesses to participate in the Missouri Linked Deposit Program; extend the period of assistance in the Show-Me Heroes Program from one year to five years following discharge; establish the Veterans’ Bill of Rights; and establish the Missouri Military Community Reinvestment Program Act to assist military communities in supporting and sustaining their installations.
  • Benevolent Tax Credits (HBs 1288, 1377 & 2050) –The legislature gave approval this session to legislation that will continue and expand support for pregnancy resource centers and maternity homes in Missouri. The bill would extend the sunset for tax credits that help encourage investment in these programs that benefit many of Missouri’s most vulnerable citizens. The legislation will extend the sunset for both credits to 2024 and increase the maximum amount of each credit that is available annually. Currently there are $2.5 million in credits available each year for pregnancy resource centers, and $2.5 million in credits each year for maternity homes. The bill will increase the cap on each credit to $3.5 million annually. The legislation also reauthorizes the Donated Food tax credit until 2026 and expands the credit to include food or cash donated to local soup kitchens or homeless shelters. Additionally, it would create a Diaper Bank tax credit that authorizes a tax credit in the amount of fifty percent of a contribution to a diaper bank. The bill also extends the Champion for Children Tax Credit for child advocacy centers until 2025, and creates a tax credit for taxpayers who make a contribution to organizations that provide funding for the unmet health, hunger, and hygiene needs of children in school.


Unclaimed Property

Missouri State Treasurer Eric Schmitt has informed my office that he currently holds $1,608,637.46 in unclaimed property belonging to approximately 16,697 account owners within the 120th District. This money is sitting in holding awaiting the rightful owners to come forward.

Therefore, I encourage you to search for and claim your property free of charge at: www.ShowMeMoney.com

Banks, businesses, and insurance companies turn over Unclaimed Property to the Treasurer after accounts have been inactive and owners cannot be successfully contacted for a statutorily defined period of time, generally five years.

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

The Capitol Report | May 11th, 2018

State Budget Now Complete

The members of the House and Senate this week gave final approval to a state spending plan that will make a record investment in K-12 public education. The $28.3 billion state operating budget approved by the General Assembly will fully fund the school foundation formula for the second consecutive year. Additionally, the plan keeps funding stable for Missouri’s institutions of higher learning, which will minimize potential tuition increases for students.

The budget as it left the House achieved full funding for K-12 public schools with a $99 million funding increase. The Senate then reduced that number by approximately $50 million, but bumped up funding for school transportation by $25 million. The final version includes the $99 million increase to achieve full funding, which also includes $50 million in new funding for early childhood education. The final spending plan also boosts transportation funding by $10 million.

The governor had recommended a cut of $68 million for higher education funding in his budget proposal. The spending plan approved by the General Assembly restores this cut in conjunction with a pledge by the state’s universities and colleges to raise tuition by no more than 1 percent. Only Missouri Southern State University is exempted from the agreement. Schools must hold to that pledge as long as they receive the funds allotted for them in the budget. If for some reason the funds would be withheld, the schools would be allowed to increase tuition by the rate of inflation. The agreement is a reflection of the commitment of lawmakers to hold down the cost of higher education for students and families.

The final version of the fiscally responsible spending plan is based on a sensible consensus revenue estimate that will avoid shortfalls that could force the governor to withhold funds. This year’s budget plan enforces fiscal discipline by holding welfare spending in check. It also includes a budget reserve of $100 million to allow for emergency spending needs. Additionally, the budget plan does not include a plan endorsed by the governor to borrow $250 million to expedite tax refunds.

The budget approved by the General Assembly also has a strong commitment to transparency. In addition to eliminating all “E”s, which represent open-ended spending limits on funds, the spending plan improves transparency in several other key areas. The budget plan breaks down spending for the state’s legal expense fund, which previously had no system in place to track how dollars are spent to pay for settlements and judgments against state agencies. In addition, the spending plan improves transparency for spending within the state’s conservation department, and for dollars allocated to home-delivered meals. The budget also makes a $34-million fund in the Department of Corrections transparent and accountable for the first time.

In total, the $28.3 billion spending plan is approximately $632 million smaller than the plan proposed by the governor. The budget would utilize roughly $9.43 billion in state general revenue dollars, which is approximately $481 million less than the governor called for in his budget proposal.

If you ever have questions, comments, or concerns, please call my office at 573-751-1688 or email me at:
jason.chipman@house.mo.gov

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

 

House and Senate Give Final Approval to State Operating Budget (HBs 2001-2013)

The members of the House and Senate this week gave final approval to a state spending plan that will make a record investment in K-12 public education. The $28.3 billion state operating budget approved by the General Assembly will fully fund the school foundation formula for the second consecutive year. Additionally, the plan keeps funding stable for Missouri’s institutions of higher learning, which will minimize potential tuition increases for students.

The budget as it left the House achieved full funding for K-12 public schools with a $99 million funding increase. The Senate then reduced that number by approximately $50 million, but bumped up funding for school transportation by $25 million. The final version includes the $99 million increase to achieve full funding, which also includes $50 million in new funding for early childhood education. The final spending plan also boosts transportation funding by $10 million.

The governor had recommended a cut of $68 million for higher education funding in his budget proposal. The spending plan approved by the General Assembly restores this cut in conjunction with a pledge by the state’s universities and colleges to raise tuition by no more than 1 percent. Only Missouri Southern State University is exempted from the agreement. Schools must hold to that pledge as long as they receive the funds allotted for them in the budget. If for some reason the funds would be withheld, the schools would be allowed to increase tuition by the rate of inflation. The agreement is a reflection of the commitment of lawmakers to hold down the cost of higher education for students and families.

The final version of the fiscally responsible spending plan is based on a sensible consensus revenue estimate that will avoid shortfalls that could force the governor to withhold funds. This year’s budget plan enforces fiscal discipline by holding welfare spending in check. It also includes a budget reserve of $100 million to allow for emergency spending needs. Additionally, the budget plan does not include a plan endorsed by the governor to borrow $250 million to expedite tax refunds.

The budget approved by the General Assembly also has a strong commitment to transparency. In addition to eliminating all “E”s, which represent open-ended spending limits on funds, the spending plan improves transparency in several other key areas. The budget plan breaks down spending for the state’s legal expense fund, which previously had no system in place to track how dollars are spent to pay for settlements and judgments against state agencies. In addition, the spending plan improves transparency for spending within the state’s conservation department, and for dollars allocated to home-delivered meals. The budget also makes a $34-million fund in the Department of Corrections transparent and accountable for the first time.

In total, the $28.3 billion spending plan is approximately $632 million smaller than the plan proposed by the governor. The budget would utilize roughly $9.43 billion in state general revenue dollars, which is approximately $481 million less than the governor called for in his budget proposal.

Other highlights of the FY 2019 Budget include:

Education

  • Continued state support for several of Missouri’s cooperative higher education programs, including the Cooperative Medical School Program with MU and Missouri State; the Cooperative Dental Program with UMKC and Missouri Southern; the Pharmacy Doctorate Program with UMKC and MSU; and the Cooperative Engineering Program with Missouri S&T and Missouri State.
  • Funding increases recommended by the governor for the state’s scholarship programs, which include a $2 million increase for Access Missouri, $3.5 million in additional funds for the A+ Scholarship Program; and an additional $1 million for Bright Flight.
  • $2 million increase in funding towards two-year colleges for the Missouri SkillUP Program that provides free job training and employment opportunities for low-income Missourians.
  • $2 million one-time boost in funding for Missouri Southern State University and $750,000 one-time boost in funding for Harris-Stowe State University.
  • $300,000 in new funding for school safety grants.
  • $250,000 to a new Kindergarten through 3rd Grade reading assessment program for dyslexia diagnoses.

Social Programs

  • $1.8 million increase in funding for the state’s independent living centers, which help people with disabilities to increase their independence and their opportunity to participate in day-to-day life within their communities.
  • $4 million in state support for Missouri’s Access to Recovery program and peer support, which helps individuals and families struggling with substance use disorders and provides the tools needed for long-term recovery.
  • $5 million in new money to provide community-based services that will allow those battling substance abuse to receive appropriate treatment as an alternative to prison.
  • $1 million increase for the state’s drug treatment courts to partially restore an FY18 cut.
  • $500,000 for a pilot project to extend MO HealthNet benefits to pregnant women who are receiving substance abuse treatment within 60 days of giving birth for a full year.
  • $487,000 to increase state support for juvenile advocacy officers under the public defender system.
  • $72 million increase for nursing home reimbursements, an additional $1 million for developmental disability rebasing, and a 1.5% rate increase for all other Medicaid providers.

Community and Economic Issues

  • $8.5 million increase in funding for the First Steps Program that provides services to families with children, birth to three years of age, with disabilities or developmental delays.
  • $400,000 restoration of proposed cuts to the Missouri National Guard to prevent the closure of several armories.
  • $4 million in funding to make good on the state’s commitment to the Biodiesel Producer Incentive Fund.
  • A 1% pay increase for state employees starting January 1st, 2019.  (Does not include legislators).
  • $374,000 for a physician prescription monitoring program to curb opioid abuse.
  • $7.25 million allocated to reduce air pollution control activities from the state’s settlement with Volkswagen.
  • $3 million to initiate a water resource and reservoir fund for communities with water shortage issues to access.
  • $4.75 million increase over the governor’s recommendation for tourism funding and grants ($14.75 million total).
  • $65 million in federal funds for emergency preparedness through the Community Development Block Grants program.

Missouri Celebrates Truman Day

While the legislature continued to work on the state holiday of Truman Day, House members did pause to pay tribute to one of Missouri’s greatest citizens, and the only president to hail from the Show-Me State. The holiday is meant to observe the May 8 birthday of Harry S. Truman and to honor Truman for his distinguished public service.

Truman was born in Lamar, Missouri on May 8, 1884. As he grew up, he lived in Harrisonville, Belton, Grandview, and Independence. Truman served with the Missouri National Guard from 1909 until 1911. During World War I, he was sent to France, where he became an officer and then a battery commander.

Truman went on to become one of three judges of the Jackson County Court. He was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1934 and served in the body for 10 years. During his time in the Senate, he served as the chairman of the Senate Special Committee to Investigate the National Defense Program, which was also known as the Truman Committee.

Truman was selected as the candidate for vice-president to Franklin D. Roosevelt. Who won his fourth term as President of the United States on November 7, 1944. He took office January 20, 1945. On April 12 of the same year, Roosevelt passed away as the result of a massive stroke and Truman became president.

Truman was president for two terms until January 20, 1953. During the first six months of his first term, Truman announced the surrender of the Germans, ended World War II after dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and signed the charter establishing the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). His time in office also saw the conflict between mainland China and Taiwan; the Korean War; the First Indochina War; and the rise of the Soviet Union as a nuclear power.

After his presidency, Truman returned to live in Independence, where he founded the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum.

Veterans Will Receive Free Dental Care at Nearly 450 Aspen Dental Practices

Thousands of veterans will receive free dental care on Saturday, June 9th, when dentists and their teams from nearly 450 Aspen Dental-branded practices in 37 states open their doors for Aspen Dental’s National Day of Service.

Interested veterans should call 1-844-AspenHMM (1-844-277-3646) to find a participating practice in their community and schedule an appointment in advance – space is limited and appointments are filling up fast!

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov