Capitol Report | February 4th, 2016

Sponsored Legislation, Medication, & Human Trafficking

As we close out another legislative week, I would like to share a few important updates with you. First, here are a few additional bills that I have sponsored this legislative session:

HB 2097—House Bill 2097 changes the law regarding athletic scholarships. The bill requires that if a student athlete receiving an athletic scholarship from an athletic program at a public college or university in Missouri suffers an injury as a result of the athlete’s participation in the athletic program, as specified in the bill, the athletic program must renew the athlete’s athletic scholarship at the same amount provided at the time of the injury until the athlete obtains an undergraduate degree, but no longer than five academic years.

HB 2098—House Bill 2098, beginning August 28, 2016, this bill allows students enrolled in public institution of higher education in Missouri to be able to choose whether or not to live in residence halls on campus.

HB 2099—House Bill 2099, beginning August 28, 2016, this bill prohibits any public institution of higher education in Missouri from requiring students to purchase meal plans or require students to dine at on-campus facilities.

HB 2100—House Bill 2100 requires a public college or university to reimburse students 25% of the tuition and fees for any course if the assigned faculty member fails to teach at least 75% of the course, without good cause, or a student teaching assistant is the sole instructor present for at least 75% of the class.

In other news, the House gave near-unanimous approval to legislation that would proactively update Missouri’s pharmaceutical laws to keep pace with the rapidly advancing technological developments available in health care. The goal of the bill is to give Missourians better, more affordable access to interchangeable biological products, which are similar in nature to the generic versions of traditional medications. These products are used in the treatment of chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and various forms of cancer.

The House also took time this week to give overwhelming approval to legislation designed to help stop the multi-billion dollar criminal industry of human trafficking. The legislation would expand the crime of sexual trafficking of a child to include the advertisement of a child participating in a commercial sexual act. Similar to the federal SAVE Act that is now law, the legislation would give law enforcement another tool to investigate and prosecute those who knowingly advertise the victims of sex trafficking.

You may read more about what is happening at your Capitol below. As always, I will work diligently and tirelessly for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

Sponsored Legislation
Here is a list of a few more bills that I have sponsored this legislative session:

HB 2097—House Bill 2097 changes the law regarding athletic scholarships. The bill requires that if a student athlete receiving an athletic scholarship from an athletic program at a public college or university in Missouri suffers an injury as a result of the athlete’s participation in the athletic program, as specified in

the bill, the athletic program must renew the athlete’s athletic scholarship at the same amount provided at the time of the injury until the athlete obtains an undergraduate degree, but no longer than five academic years.

HB 2098—House Bill 2098, beginning August 28, 2016, this bill allows students enrolled in public institution of higher education in Missouri to be able to choose whether or not to live in residence halls on campus.

HB 2099—House Bill 2099, beginning August 28, 2016, this bill prohibits any public institution of higher education in Missouri from requiring students to purchase meal plans or require students to dine at on-campus facilities.

HB 2100—House Bill 2100 requires a public college or university to reimburse students 25% of the tuition and fees for any course if the assigned faculty member fails to teach at least 75% of the course, without good cause, or a student teaching assistant is the sole instructor present for at least 75% of the class.

Missouri House Approves Legislation to Provide Affordable Access to Cutting Edge Medications (HB 1366 & 1878)
Members of the Missouri House of Representatives gave near-unanimous approval to legislation that would proactively update Missouri’s pharmaceutical laws to keep pace with the rapidly advancing technological developments available in health care. The goal of the bill is to give Missourians better, more affordable access to interchangeable biological products, which are similar in nature to the generic versions of traditional medications. These products are used in the treatment of chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and various forms of cancer. Missouri law currently allows for the safe substitution of generic medications, but the law does not allow for the substitution of biological drug products. The legislation approved by the House would simply update Missouri’s law to allow for the safe substitution of interchangeable biosimilar medications. It’s a move that 20 states have already made to improve access to these affordable medications that have been proven to be safe by rigorous FDA testing. Supporters of the bill said it will give Missourians access to the least expensive versions of the medications they need. They pointed out that approximately 40 biological medications are currently in development and that it is important to ensure Missourians will have access to these medications. They also noted the move would generate approximately $12 million in savings for the state.

Continuing the Fight against Human Traffickers (HB 1562)
The House also took time this week to give overwhelming approval to legislation designed to help stop the multi-billion dollar criminal industry of human trafficking. The legislation would expand the crime of sexual trafficking of a child to include the advertisement of a child participating in a commercial sexual act. Similar to the federal SAVE Act that is now law, the legislation would give law enforcement another tool to investigate and prosecute those who knowingly advertise the victims of sex trafficking.

While Missouri doesn’t have an enormous number of trafficking incidents, the City of St. Louis is one of the top 20 trafficking cities in the country according to the F.B.I. Furthermore, this modern form of slavery is widespread throughout the country and leads to thousands of men, women and children being exploited and forced into prostitution each year. Fortunately, Missouri has been proactive in its approach to stop traffickers. It was in 2004 that Missouri became one of the first states in the nation to put sex trafficking laws in place. And just last year the General Assembly approved legislation to create a task force to study additional ways to strengthen Missouri’s laws to further crack down on traffickers. The task force traveled around the state gathering information and then worked together to formulate solutions that would allow the state to better protect the lives of the innocent. The bill approved by the House this week is an important part of the comprehensive approach the legislature wants to take to fight human trafficking in Missouri. As the sponsor of the bill said, “We may have partisan fights on issues like the budget, taxes, and education, but when it comes to trafficking, we don’t fight each other. We fight the traffickers; as one. It’s us against them. And we will win.”

House Approves Legislation to Protect Mental Health Professionals from Continued Lawsuits (HB 1619)
House members gave approval to legislation meant to clarify Missouri law to protect mental health professionals from limitless liability for malpractice claims. The bill would establish a two-year statute of limitations for actions against a mental health professional for malpractice, negligence, error, or mistake. HB 1619 is identical to legislation filed during the 2015 session that received near-unanimous approval in the House and committee approval in the Senate, but failed to cross the legislative finish line before the Senate became gridlocked in a filibuster in the final week of session. Supporters hope to push the bill into law in 2016 to give mental health professionals peace of mind that they will not be subjected to lawsuits years later in retirement. The sponsor of the bill noted during floor debate that mental health providers were meant to fall under the same statute of limitations as other health care providers, but the law was never updated to reflect that fact. He said that as things currently stand, mental health providers have to keep costly malpractice insurance until the day they die. The legislation approved by the House would allow mental health professionals to retire without fear of costly lawsuits or the need to constantly pay for insurance.
House Advances Legislation to Promote Mental Health for Medical Students (HB 1658)The Missouri House of Representatives this week sent legislation to the Senate that would create the Show-Me Compassionate Medical Education Act. The bill is designed to raise awareness about the high rate of depression and suicide among medical students, and promote research on the issue. The sponsor of the bill told his colleagues that medical students are often hesitant to seek help out of fear that it could hurt their careers. The bill approved by the House would create the Show-Me Compassionate Medical Education Research Project Committee to collaborate with medical schools to conduct a study on how to reduce medical student depression and suicide. The legislation also would designate August 28 as Show-Me Compassionate Medical Education Day in Missouri. The day is designed to encourage Missourians to participate in activities and events to increase awareness regarding the metal well-being of medical students.
House Committee Considers Cronkite New Voices Act to Ensure the Free Speech Rights of Student Journalists (HB 2058)
The House Emerging Issues Committee approved legislation designed to better protect the free speech rights of student journalists. The Cronkite New Voices Act is meant to ensure high school and college student reporters will be able to do their jobs without fear of censorship from administrators or teachers. The bill, which is modeled after a law passed in North Dakota, would prevent school authorities from exercising prior restraints over student media except when they are about to publish libelous or slanderous material, invade privacy, violate state or federal law or incite students to create a clear and present danger to the institution. It also would restrict authorities from disciplining student journalists or controlling their activities outside of school. As the sponsor of the bill said, “Missouri is the home of one of the world’s most famous and iconic journalists in Walter Cronkite, but also the home of the Hazelwood decision that saw the rights of student journalists suppressed. My hope is that we can reestablish Missouri as a place that supports the freedom of the press, and protects the rights of high school and college student journalists.” Student journalist Tim Tai, whose First Amendment rights were violated by faculty and students at the University of Missouri, attended the hearing to testify in support of the bill. He was joined by student free speech advocate Cathy Kuhlmeier Frey, who also testified in support of the bill. The legislation also has received the support of the Missouri Journalism Education Association, the Missouri Press Association and the Missouri College Media Association.

State Legislators Go Red to Raise Awareness of Heart Disease
The Missouri State Capitol was colored in red Wednesday, February 3 as legislators and staff came together to observe the American Heart Association’s “Wear Red Day”. The day, which is designed to raise awareness of the rate of heart disease in women, was started in 2003 and has become an annual event in the Missouri General Assembly. While many think of heart disease as a man’s disease, the truth is that heart disease and stroke kill one out of every 3 women. Awareness is crucial because 80 percent of cardiac events can be prevented with education and lifestyle changes. Members and staff of the House and Senate come together each year to do their part to make women aware of the simple changes they can make to promote a healthier and longer life. “On The Couch” Interview

I was honored to sit down recently with Mike Delashmit from Fidelity Local 6—On The Couch. We discussed a range of topics from family life to the legislative process! To watch the interview, check out the video links below:

https://youtu.be/LPIU8LJhmQA

https://youtu.be/tEsLhArhX5E

Capitol Visit020216-0019
Reps. Frederick, Duggar, Ross, Pogue, and I were honored to visit with four Intercounty Electric Board Members on the House Floor this week.

Women Legislators of Missouri
The Women Legislators of Missouri will once again honor one of the state’s most outstanding female leaders who has made major contributions to equality and social justice for all Missourians. The group is currently accepting nominations for the DeVerne Lee Calloway Award, which is named in honor of the first female African-American member of the Missouri General Assembly.

Calloway was elected to the Missouri House of Representatives in 1962. There she made hard-fought gains for education, for children, and for the blind, the disabled and the elderly. She served nine terms in the legislature and before retiring in November of 1980. The DeVerne Lee Calloway Award is presented each year in honor of Calloway’s life in service to others.

Nominations can be submitted to the office of State Rep. Tila Hubrecht by email at Tila.Hubrecht@house.mo.gov, or by traditional mail to Representative Tila Hubrecht, State Capitol, Room 203-C, 201 West Capitol Avenue, Jefferson City, MO 65101. Nominations must be postmarked by 5 p.m., March 3, 2016. To obtain a copy of the nomination form, please contact Rep. Hubrecht’s office. The award will be presented to the winner during the Women Legislators of Missouri reception the afternoon of Monday, April 18.

Senior Service Awards
The Lieutenant Governor’s Senior Service Awards are intended to promote and highlight the positive accomplishments Missouri’s senior citizens provide their local communities. Individuals should be at least 60 years of age and volunteer a minimum of 25 hours per year to qualify.

To complete an application, please visit http://ltgov.mo.gov/assistance-seniors/senior-service-awards/ or contact my office for assistance: State Representative Jason Chipman 573-751-1688.

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 115H, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s