Capitol Report | July 21st, 2016

Governor Takes Final Actions 

The governor recently finished taking action on the numerous pieces of legislation sent to his desk by the Missouri General Assembly. The governor had until July 14 to act on each of the measures. When the governor considers the bills sent to him by the legislature he has the option of signing a bill into law, vetoing it to prevent it from taking effect, or taking no action on a bill, which allows it to go into law without his approval.

During the 2016 legislative session House members filed more than 1,600 pieces of legislation, and members of the Senate filed more than 600. Of those measures, 82 bills and joint resolutions from the House made it across the finish line. The Senate saw 57 pieces of legislation receive final approval from the General Assembly.

The governor then took action by signing 115 bills into law; allowing three bills to take effect without his signature; vetoing 23 measures; and using his line-item vetoes on two budget bills. The governor’s total includes a House Concurrent Resolution that he signed into effect, and a Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR 46) that he vetoed, but then saw the veto overridden by the legislature during the regular session. The governor also saw his veto of legislation (SBs 586 & 651) to update the funding formula for Missouri’s public schools overridden while the General Assembly was still in session.

Additionally, he vetoed “Paycheck Protection” legislation (HB 1891) during the regular session, which the House successfully voted to override but the Senate fell one vote shy in its override attempt.

When the House and Senate return for the General Assembly’s annual Veto Session this September, members of the two chambers will have 20 vetoed bills and two line-item vetoes in the state operating budget to consider. Over the next few weeks I will provide brief overviews of some of the issues most likely to take center stage during the upcoming Veto Session.

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below. As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

When the House and Senate return for the General Assembly’s annual Veto Session this September, members of the two chambers will have 20 vetoed bills and two line-item vetoes in the state operating budget to consider. Over the next few weeks I will provide brief overviews of some of the issues most likely to take center stage during the upcoming Veto Session.

Voter ID (HB 1631)

While Missouri voters will have the opportunity in November to decide if citizens should be required to show a valid form of photo identification in order to vote, the governor vetoed the bill that would have put such a system in place if the constitutional change is approved.

If the constitutional change is approved by voters, and the veto of HB 1631 is overridden, Missouri would then implement a system of voter identification. The bill would require voters to present a specified form of identification in order to vote in a public election. Valid forms of identification would include photo IDs issued by the state, the federal government or the military. The bill also would require the state to pay for individuals to obtain a valid ID if they do not have one, or to obtain documents necessary for an ID. Additionally, the final version of the HB 1631 contains a provision that would allow a voter without a valid photo ID to vote with a regular ballot by showing another form of identification.

Strengthening Second Amendment Rights (SB 656)

The governor vetoed legislation that the Missouri General Assembly approved to strengthen the gun rights of law-abiding Missourians. If the veto is overridden by the legislature in September, the bill would allow Missourians to carry a concealed weapon without the need for a permit.

Commonly referred to as constitutional carry, the bill would allow any person to carry a concealed firearm anywhere that isn’t expressly prohibited by law. The bill is meant to build on the constitutional change made by Missouri citizens in 2014 that allows Missourians the right to permit-less carry.

The bill also would ensure that individuals who do want to obtain a five-year concealed carry permit will not be charged a fee in excess of $100. The bill would specifically prohibit additional fees that may be charged, including any fee for fingerprinting or a criminal background check. Additionally, the bill will allow Missouri citizens to obtain 10-year, 25-year, or lifetime permits for $200, $250, and $500 respectively.

The legislation also contains a provision commonly referred to as the “Stand Your Ground” law. The measure would remove the requirement that a person who is any place they are legally allowed to be can use force without retreating first. The bill would also expand the state’s castle doctrine law. Current statute allows individuals to use deadly force to defend themselves and their property against intruders. The bill approved by lawmakers would extend the protection against lawsuits to house guests who use deadly force.

Big Government Get Off My Back Act (HB 1870)

The governor also vetoed legislation meant to cut the bureaucratic red tape that too often stifles the growth of small businesses in Missouri. If the General Assembly overrides the governor’s veto, the bill would revive the Big Government Get Off My Back Act for tax years 2016 through 2021.

The act originally ran from 2009 to 2014 and was instrumental in prohibiting burdensome new rules and regulations on small businesses, as well as unnecessary fee increases. The act also gives a $10,000 tax deduction for any small business, with 50 employees or less, that hires additional employees and pays them at least the average county wage. A business can claim a $20,000 deduction if it also pays for at least half of its employees’ health insurance premiums.

In its final year in 2014, the act provided tax relief to 196 small businesses throughout Missouri. Supporters hope to provide assistance to even more businesses by reviving the program.

District Visitchipman_johnbutz

Last week, I was happy to present Rolla City Administrator John Butz a House Resolution from Rep. Keith Frederick and me in honor of John Butz Appreciation Day. Since 1997, John has provided a guiding hand in making Rolla a great and safe place to live.

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 115H, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

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