The Capitol Report | September 15th, 2016

Successful Veto Session Comes To A Close

Yesterday the General Assembly wrapped up a very successful Veto Session. The General Assembly had a total of 20 vetoed bills to consider for potential overrides at the start of the day yesterday. By the end of the day, the House and Senate had each obtained the votes necessary to enact 13 vetoed bills into law. The total includes seven House Bills and six Senate Bills. The 13 overrides bring the total for the 2016 session to 15 overrides of gubernatorial vetoes. It was during the regular session that the legislature successfully overrode the governor on two measures he had vetoed. The House also attempted but failed on a third attempt at an override during the regular session.

Before yesterday, the total number of overrides in state history stood at 106, with 57 overrides completed on non-appropriations bills and 49 on budget line-items. Of that total, 84 of the 106 overrides had occurred under the administration of the current governor. With the new totals from yesterday added, the total number of overrides in state history now stands at 119, with 97 of those overrides occurring under Governor Nixon.

Over the next few weeks, I will summarize the bills that were acted upon during this year’s Veto Session.

As the Veto Session ran into the evening the Missouri General Assembly took up and approved an override of the governor’s veto of legislation to strengthen the gun rights of law-abiding Missourians. SB 656 will now become law and allow Missourians to carry a concealed weapon without the need for a permit.

The Missouri House began the day by overriding the governor’s veto of a bill that would require Missourians to show a photo ID in order to vote. The Senate then completed the override motion later in the day. The bill would implement a system of voter identification in the state if Missouri voters approve a constitutional change that is on the November ballot.

The House and Senate also worked together during the Veto Session to override the governor’s veto of legislation meant to support and encourage employee-owned businesses. The bill creates a 50 percent income tax deduction for business owners who sell at least 30 percent of their companies to their employees.

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below. As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason


Strengthening Second Amendment Rights (SB 656)

As the Veto Session ran into the evening the Missouri General Assembly took up and approved an override of the governor’s veto of legislation to strengthen the gun rights of law-abiding Missourians. The bill will now become law and allow Missourians to carry a concealed weapon without the need for a permit.

Commonly referred to as constitutional carry, the bill will allow any person to carry a concealed firearm anywhere that isn’t expressly prohibited by law. The bill is meant to build on the constitutional change made by Missouri citizens in 2014 that allows Missourians the right to permit-less carry.

The bill also will ensure that individuals who do want to obtain a five-year concealed carry permit will not be charged a fee in excess of $100. The bill will specifically prohibit additional fees that may be charged, including any fee for fingerprinting or a criminal background check. Additionally, the bill will allow Missouri citizens to obtain 10-year, 25-year, or lifetime permits for $200, $250, and $500 respectively.

The legislation also contains a provision commonly referred to as the “Stand Your Ground” law. The measure will remove the requirement that a person who is any place they are legally allowed to be can use force without retreating first. The bill will also expand the state’s castle doctrine law. Current statute allows individuals to use deadly force to defend themselves and their property against intruders. The bill approved by lawmakers will extend the protection against lawsuits to house guests who use deadly force.

House and Senate Override Voter ID Veto (HB 1631)

The Missouri House began the day by overriding the governor’s veto of a bill that would require Missourians to show a photo ID in order to vote. The Senate then completed the override motion later in the day. The bill would implement a system of voter identification in the state if Missouri voters approve a constitutional change that is on the November ballot.

If the constitutional change is approved by voters, Missouri will then implement a system of voter identification. The bill that now becomes law would require voters to present a specified form of identification in order to vote in a public election. Valid forms of identification would include photo IDs issued by the state, the federal government or the military.

The bill also would require the state to pay for individuals to obtain a valid ID if they do not have one, or to obtain documents necessary for an ID. Additionally, the final version of the HB 1631 contains a provision that would allow a voter without a valid photo ID to vote with a regular ballot by showing another form of identification.

Supporters of the change say it is vital to efforts to protect the integrity of the election process. They say it is a simple matter of voters proving they are who they say they are before casting a vote so that voter fraud can be prevented.

Encouraging Investment in Employee-Owned Businesses (HB 2030)

The House and Senate also worked together during the Veto Session to override the governor’s veto of legislation meant to support and encourage employee-owned businesses. The bill creates a 50 percent income tax deduction for business owners who sell at least 30 percent of their companies to their employees.

Similar to legislation enacted in states like Nebraska and Iowa, the legislation is designed to give owners an incentive to keep their businesses in Missouri rather than sell them to out-of-state interests. In addition, the legislation will give employees greater stake in the operation of the company that employs them.

When he vetoed the bill, the governor said the cost of the tax break would be too much for the state to afford. However, House members came together in bipartisan fashion to override his veto as they said his projected cost to the state is unrealistic and inflated.

District Visits

I was honored to be at Troop I Headquarters in Rolla last Thursday for the unveiling of the sign for the Trooper Gary Snodgrass Memorial Bridge. Trooper Snodgrass was from Crawford County and was killed in the line of duty outside of Salem in 1970.

20110906-911flag-cityroom-blog480

I was also honored today to present Gary Barcus with a House Resolution at the St. James Distribution Center commemorating him on his achievement as a professional driver within the Wal-Mart Private Fleet. Mr. Barcus is now one of only three in the fleet to have achieved the designation of 4 Million Accident Free Miles.

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 115-H, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s