The Capitol Report | November 3rd, 2016

Election Day Approaches: Ballot Measures

In just a few short days, Election Day will be upon us. On November 8th, we the people, will vote and help determine the future of our state and the nation. Many have fought so diligently to ensure every American has the right to vote, so please exercise your civic duty and vote! As a reminder, there will be several ballot measures for your consideration this election cycle. Brief summaries of the measures are as follows:

Amendment 1 deals with the continuation of a sales/use tax for soil and water conservation and for state parks and historic sites. Voting “yes” on this amendment would support a continuation of the tax that is already in place. If passed, this measure will not increase or decrease taxes. If not passed, the sales/use tax will expire.

Amendment 2 deals with campaign contributions. If this amendment passes, there will be limits implemented on the campaign contributions that individuals can make to political parties or to political committees to elect candidates for state office. If not passed, the Missouri Constitution will not be amended to establish campaign contribution limits.

Amendment 3 deals with cigarette tax. If passed, the amendment would increase taxes on cigarettes gradually, eventually ending in a 60 cent increase by 2020. Funds from this tax would go to the newly established Early Childhood Health and Education Trust Fund. If not passed, the Missouri Constitution will not be amended relating to taxes and fees on cigarettes. Amendment 3 is competing with Proposition A (below).

Amendment 4 would make a state or local sales taxes on services illegal. Services, like day care and haircuts, are currently untaxed in the state (as opposed to goods). A “yes” vote will amend the Missouri Constitution to prohibit a new state or local sales/use or other similar tax on any service or transaction. This amendment only applies to any service or transaction that was not subject to a sales/use or similar tax as of January 1, 2015. A “no” vote will not amend the Missouri Constitution to prohibit such state or local sales/use or other similar tax. If passed, this measure will not increase or decrease taxes.

Amendment 6 deals with Voter ID. If passed, this amendment would require voters to present government-issued identification when voting. A “yes” vote will amend the Missouri Constitution to state that voters may be required by law to verify their identity, citizenship, and residence by presenting identification that may include valid government-issued photo identification. A “no” vote will not amend the Missouri Constitution regarding elections. If passed, this measure will have no impact on taxes.

Proposition A deals with cigarette tax and is competing with Amendment 3 (above). It would place an additional tax of 23 cents on cigarettes. Money from the tax is to put toward transportation funds. A “yes” vote will amend Missouri law to increase taxes on cigarettes in 2017, 2019, and 2021, at which point this additional tax will total 23 cents per pack of 20. A “no” vote will not amend Missouri law relating to taxes on cigarettes and other tobacco products. If passed, this measure will increase taxes on cigarettes and other tobacco products.

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

Upcoming Ballot Measures

 In just a few short days, Election Day will be upon us. On November 8th, we the people, will vote and help determine the future of our state and the nation. Many have fought so diligently to ensure every American has the right to vote, so please exercise your civic duty and vote! As a reminder, there will be several ballot measures for your consideration this election cycle. They are as follows:

Constitutional Amendment 1

Amendment 1 deals with the continuation of a sales/use tax for soil and water conservation and for state parks and historic sites. Voting “yes” on this amendment would support a continuation of the tax that is already in place. If passed, this measure will not increase or decrease taxes. If not passed, the sales/use tax will expire.

Constitutional Amendment 2

Amendment 2 deals with campaign contributions. If this amendment passes, there will be limits implemented on the campaign contributions that individuals can make to political parties or to political committees to elect candidates for state office. If not passed, the Missouri Constitution will not be amended to establish campaign contribution limits.

Constitutional Amendment 3

Amendment 3 deals with cigarette tax. If passed, the amendment would increase taxes on cigarettes gradually, eventually ending in a 60 cent increase by 2020. Funds from this tax would go to the newly established Early Childhood Health and Education Trust Fund. If not passed, the Missouri Constitution will not be amended relating to taxes and fees on cigarettes. Amendment 3 is competing with Proposition A (below).

Constitutional Amendment 4

Amendment 4 would make a state or local sales taxes on services illegal. Services, like day care and haircuts, are currently untaxed in the state (as opposed to goods). A “yes” vote will amend the Missouri Constitution to prohibit a new state or local sales/use or other similar tax on any service or transaction. This amendment only applies to any service or transaction that was not subject to a sales/use or similar tax as of January 1, 2015. A “no” vote will not amend the Missouri Constitution to prohibit such state or local sales/use or other similar tax. If passed, this measure will not increase or decrease taxes.

Constitutional Amendment 6

Amendment 6 deals with Voter ID. If passed, this amendment would require voters to present government-issued identification when voting. Currently, voters may bring an official piece of mail, government document, or ID to prove their identity. Supporters state that such an amendment would prevent voter fraud. A “yes” vote will amend the Missouri Constitution to state that voters may be required by law to verify their identity, citizenship, and residence by presenting identification that may include valid government-issued photo identification. A “no” vote will not amend the Missouri Constitution regarding elections. If passed, this measure will have no impact on taxes.

Proposition A

Proposition A deals with cigarette tax and is competing with Amendment 3 (above). It would place an additional tax of 23 cents on cigarettes. Money from the tax is toput toward transportation funds. A “yes” vote will amend Missouri law to increase taxes on cigarettes in 2017, 2019, and 2021, at which point this additional tax will total 23 cents per pack of 20. This amendment also increases the tax paid by sellers on other tobacco products by 5 percent of manufacturer’s invoice price. This amendment further provides that the funds generated by these taxes shall be used exclusively to fund transportation infrastructure projects. These taxes are repealed if a measure to increase any tax or fee on cigarettes or other tobacco products is certified to appear on any local or statewide ballot. A “no” vote will not amend Missouri law relating to taxes on cigarettes and other tobacco products. If passed, this measure will increase taxes on cigarettes and other tobacco products.

Dyslexia Task Force Holds First Hearing

The legislature’s Task Force on Dyslexia recently held its first hearing in the State Capitol. The group, which is made up of lawmakers, medical and education officials, and private individuals with expertise or experience with dyslexia, was created with the passage of HB 2379 during the 2016 regular session. The group is working to make recommendations to the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education in three key areas: how and when students should be screened for dyslexia; how students with reading issues can be helped in classrooms; and what professional development should be implemented to train faculty in screenings. The department will then take the task force’s recommendations and use them to develop their guidelines, which have to be completed by December 31, 2017.

One of the members of the task force talked about the experiences her niece went through as a student with dyslexia. The state representative noted that her niece was frustrated as she felt like she was doing something wrong even though she was working hard.

The task force member hopes that with early screening, students like her niece could be identified and helped to obtain the support they need to achieve their academic potential.

The task force is required to report to the governor and the legislature’s Joint Committee on Education by October 18, 2017. The chair of the task force said the group could make recommendations ahead of the deadline so that the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education would have more time to consider them. Once screenings in schools begin, the parents of students who are found to have indicators of dyslexia will be notified, so that they can choose whether to follow-up with more testing by medical professionals.

The task force plans to hold its next hearing at the end of November.

Capitol Visit

cuba-elementary-2016-2It was great to have over 130 students, parents, and teachers from Cuba Elementary come up for a visit today at the State Capitol! The students were engaged and asked great questions about our state government.

District Visit

davisville-historical-societyLast Saturday, I was honored to present Mary Young and members of the Davisville Historical Society (DHS) with a House Resolution celebrating their Silver Anniversary at the fall festival in Pucky Huddle. For 25 years, DHS has been working to preserve the history of Davisville. The society’s mission is to keep the history of Davisville alive through participation in community events. This year’s fall festival was a great success!

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 115-H, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

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