The Capitol Report | December 7th, 2017

Bill Pre-Filing Begins & California Egg Lawsuit

While the 2018 legislative session is still weeks away, House members are busy filing the legislation they will work to pass into law in the coming year. Friday, Dec. 1 marked the first day legislators in both chambers of the Missouri General Assembly could pre-file bills for the upcoming session.

The pre-filing period is already moving at a frenetic pace as House members have filed nearly 300 bills in the first five days. In comparison, House members pre-filed a total of 373 bills throughout the entire pre-filing period for the 2017 session, and 366 pieces of legislation for the 2015 regular session. So far the 2018 pre-filing period is on a pace similar to the 2016 session that set the high water mark for pre-filed bills in the House at 623.

In other news, Missouri’s Attorney General is renewing efforts to challenge a California law that forces Missouri egg producers to comply with California’s farming regulations in order to sell eggs in California. Attorney General Josh Hawley is leading the challenge that is joined by 12 other states. The 13 states are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to block the California law that requires eggs sold in the state to come from hens that have a specified amount of space in their cages.

Hawley said the regulations are “unconstitutional and a clear attempt by big-government proponents to impose job-killing regulations on Missouri.” The legal challenge made by the states provides an economic analysis showing the impact of California’s burdensome regulations. The lawsuit alleges the California law has cost consumers across the nation up to $350 million each year because of higher egg prices. A study done by an economist at the University of Missouri found that the price of a dozen eggs has increased between 1.8 percent and 5.1 percent over the last two years because of the California law.

The suit brought by Missouri and 12 other states claims that California’s regulations violate both a federal law prohibiting states from imposing their own standards on eggs produced in other states, and the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution, which gives Congress exclusive authority to regulate commerce among and between states. A similar lawsuit was previously rejected by a federal appeals court. The current legal challenge asks the Supreme Court to take up the case directly, and provides the economic analysis to show the California law impacts more than just individual farmers.

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

 

House Members Gear Up for 2018 Session as Bill Pre-Filing Period Begins

While the 2018 legislative session is still weeks away, House members are busy filing the legislation they will work to pass into law in the coming year. Friday, Dec. 1 marked the first day legislators in both chambers of the Missouri General Assembly could pre-file bills for the upcoming session.

The pre-filing period is already moving at a frenetic pace as House members have filed nearly 300 bills in the first five days. In comparison, House members pre-filed a total of 373 bills throughout the entire pre-filing period for the 2017 session, and 366 pieces of legislation for the 2015 regular session. So far the 2018 pre-filing period is on a pace similar to the 2016 session that set the high water mark for pre-filed bills in the House at 623.

House Speaker Todd Richardson issued the following statement on the first day of pre-filing: “We came to Jefferson City to get results for Missouri families, and that’s what we’re going to do. We’re taking action on important issues. Members of the House have filed bills today that increase educational opportunities, improve economic growth, and cut burdensome regulations and barriers to innovation. I look forward to working with the Governor and House members to get these priorities passed.”

Missouri Attorney General Challenges California Egg Law

Missouri’s Attorney General is renewing efforts to challenge a California law that forces Missouri egg producers to comply with California’s farming regulations in order to sell eggs in California. Attorney General Josh Hawley is leading the challenge that is joined by 12 other states. The 13 states are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to block the California law that requires eggs sold in the state to come from hens that have a specified amount of space in their cages.

Hawley said the regulations are “unconstitutional and a clear attempt by big-government proponents to impose job-killing regulations on Missouri.” The legal challenge made by the states provides an economic analysis showing the impact of California’s burdensome regulations. The lawsuit alleges the California law has cost consumers across the nation up to $350 million each year because of higher egg prices. A study done by an economist at the University of Missouri found that the price of a dozen eggs has increased between 1.8 percent and 5.1 percent over the last two years because of the California law.

The suit brought by Missouri and 12 other states claims that California’s regulations violate both a federal law prohibiting states from imposing their own standards on eggs produced in other states, and the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution, which gives Congress exclusive authority to regulate commerce among and between states. A similar lawsuit was previously rejected by a federal appeals court. The current legal challenge asks the Supreme Court to take up the case directly, and provides the economic analysis to show the California law impacts more than just individual farmers.

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

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