The Capitol Report | September 27th, 2018

Statewide Ballot Measures

This election, November 6th, the citizens of Missouri will have several legislative/constitutional issues to decide. As of 2018, citizens are required to file at least 100,126 valid signatures for initiated state statutes and veto referendums, and are required to file at least 160,199 valid signatures for initiated constitutional amendments. These signature requirements are the requirement if petitioners collect signatures in the smallest of the state’s congressional districts to satisfy the state’s distribution requirement. Collecting signatures in larger districts would result in a slightly larger signature requirement.

As Election Day approaches, I will recap the several statewide ballot measures approved to appear on the ballot this November. This week, I will begin with Amendments 2 and 3.

Amendment 2 – Missouri Amendment 2 is a marijuana legality change to the constitution. The Medical Marijuana and Veteran Healthcare Services Initiative, as it is titled, is on the ballot in Missouri as an initiated constitutional amendment.  Currently, Missouri has not legalized the use or possession or medical marijuana. Amendment 2 would legalize marijuana for medical purposes. The ballot initiative would allow state-licensed physicians to recommend marijuana use to patients with nine qualifying conditions and additional conditions with doctor’s approval. Patients would be allowed to grow six flowering plants in their homes or purchase processed marijuana.

Amendment 2 would also tax the sale of medical marijuana at 4 percent and allocate revenue from the tax toward providing healthcare services, job training, housing assistance, and other services for veterans. Amendment 2 would task the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services with overseeing and regulating the state’s medical marijuana program. The ballot initiative would authorize not less than 24 dispensaries in each of the state’s eight congressional districts, based on 2018 boundaries.

Amendment 3 – Missouri Amendment 3, the Medical Marijuana and Biomedical Research and Drug Development Institute Initiative, is on the ballot in Missouri as an initiated constitutional amendment. Amendment 3 would legalize marijuana for medical purposes. The ballot initiative would tax marijuana sales at 15 percent. Revenue from the sales tax would be used to establish and fund a Biomedical Research and Drug Development Institute, which would be tasked with researching cures for cancer and other diseases and overseeing the state’s medical marijuana program. Amendment 3 would also enact cultivation taxes on marijuana flowers ($9.25 per ounce) and on marijuana leaves ($2.75 per ounce).

The ballot initiative would allow state-licensed physicians to recommend marijuana use to patients with 10 qualifying conditions. The research institute would be empowered to add additional conditions to the list of qualifying conditions. Patients would be allowed to purchase not less than 3 ounces of dried marijuana or equivalent in 30-day period (more permitted with written certification from two independent physicians). The ballot initiative would authorize not less than two dispensaries per 20,000 residents in counties and cities

If you ever have questions, comments, or concerns, please call my office at 573-751-1688 or email me at: jason.chipman@house.mo.gov

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

 

 

Unemployment Rate

Missouri’s unemployment rate remains at an 18-year low, as the unemployment rate edged down another tenth of a point to 3.3 percent in August, while nonfarm payroll employment in the state grew by 1,000 jobs.  The monthly increase in private-sector employment was 2,700. Industries with job growth included Professional and Business Services (+4,000), Financial Activities (+1,100), and Leisure and Hospitality (+1,100).  These gains were partly offset by job decreases in Trade, Transportation and Utilities (-1,800); Manufacturing (-1,500); and Local Government (-1,600).

Over the past year, Missouri payroll employment has grown by 35,300 (+1.2 percent).  Most industry groups experienced employment growth over that period.  The largest categories of increase were in Professional and Business Services (+13,700, 3.6 percent); Private Education and Health Services (+12,100, 2.6 percent); and Leisure and Hospitality (+6,300, 2.1 percent).

Statewide Ballot Measures

This election, November 6th, the citizens of Missouri will have several legislative/constitutional issues to decide. As of 2018, citizens are required to file at least 100,126 valid signatures for initiated state statutes and veto referendums, and are required to file at least 160,199 valid signatures for initiated constitutional amendments. These signature requirements are the requirement if petitioners collect signatures in the smallest of the state’s congressional districts to satisfy the state’s distribution requirement. Collecting signatures in larger districts would result in a slightly larger signature requirement.

As Election Day approaches, I will recap the several statewide ballot measures approved to appear on the ballot this November. This week, I will begin with Amendments 2 and 3.

Amendment 2 – Missouri Amendment 2 is a marijuana legality change to the constitution. The Medical Marijuana and Veteran Healthcare Services Initiative, as it is titled, is on the ballot in Missouri as an initiated constitutional amendment.  Currently, Missouri has not legalized the use or possession or medical marijuana. Amendment 2 would legalize marijuana for medical purposes. The ballot initiative would allow state-licensed physicians to recommend marijuana use to patients with nine qualifying conditions and additional conditions with doctor’s approval. Patients would be allowed to grow six flowering plants in their homes or purchase processed marijuana.

Amendment 2 would also tax the sale of medical marijuana at 4 percent and allocate revenue from the tax toward providing healthcare services, job training, housing assistance, and other services for veterans. Amendment 2 would task the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services with overseeing and regulating the state’s medical marijuana program. The ballot initiative would authorize not less than 24 dispensaries in each of the state’s eight congressional districts, based on 2018 boundaries.

A “yes” vote supports this constitutional amendment to:

  • legalize marijuana for medical purposes;
  • tax marijuana sales at 4 percent; and
  • spend tax revenue on healthcare services for veterans.

A “no” vote opposes this constitutional amendment.

Amendment 3 – Missouri Amendment 3, the Medical Marijuana and Biomedical Research and Drug Development Institute Initiative, is on the ballot in Missouri as an initiated constitutional amendment. Amendment 3 would legalize marijuana for medical purposes. The ballot initiative would tax marijuana sales at 15 percent. Revenue from the sales tax would be used to establish and fund a Biomedical Research and Drug Development Institute, which would be tasked with researching cures for cancer and other diseases and overseeing the state’s medical marijuana program. Amendment 3 would also enact cultivation taxes on marijuana flowers ($9.25 per ounce) and on marijuana leaves ($2.75 per ounce).

The ballot initiative would allow state-licensed physicians to recommend marijuana use to patients with 10 qualifying conditions. The research institute would be empowered to add additional conditions to the list of qualifying conditions. Patients would be allowed to purchase not less than 3 ounces of dried marijuana or equivalent in 30-day period (more permitted with written certification from two independent physicians). The ballot initiative would authorize not less than two dispensaries per 20,000 residents in counties and cities.

A “yes” vote supports this constitutional amendment to:

  • legalize marijuana for medical purposes;
  • tax marijuana sales at 15 percent; and
  • spend tax revenue on a Biomedical Research and Drug Development Institute.

A “no” vote opposes this constitutional amendment.
District Visits

VernaBrand&RamonaStJamesCaringCenterVerna Brand, Board Member, and Ramona Rinehart, Executive Director, of the St. James Caring Center were kind enough to give me a tour of the their facilities and the new senior center. They are doing tremendous work, and I am grateful they are in our community.
gc-logo-fsEarlier this week, I worked with Carmen Schulze and Carrie Myers to tour Great Circle in St. James. They showed me their facilities and we discussed the recent progress that has been made and future improvement plans. I look forward to seeing how they continue to help those in need.

 

 

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

 

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