Category Archives: Government

The Capitol Report | October 19th, 2017

New Jobs Coming to Missouri

Governor Greitens recently announced that 800 new jobs will soon be coming to Missouri. The new jobs will come from an increase in Missouri’s National Guard. The new jobs will include transportation units, military police units, and cyber units and have an estimated economic impact of $15 million.

The new jobs include a new Transportation Battalion in southeast Missouri’s Fredericktown and a new Transportation Company in southwest Missouri’s Anderson and Monett. The new units also include the 1231st Transportation Company in Bridgeton and Columbia and the 1136th Military Police Company in Lebanon and Rolla.

In addition, by the end of 2019, the new 1251st Transportation Company in Farmington and Perryville is expected to be in place, along with the 529th Trial Defense Team in Jefferson City and the 1135th Maintenance Company in Kansas City.

In other news, Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union have recently sued Missouri over a portion of a new law put in place by the legislature and the governor during one of the special sessions held this summer. Specifically, the two organizations are trying to block a provision of Senate Bill 5 that would require the doctor who will perform an abortion to give information about the procedure to the woman 72 hours before it is performed.

Current Missouri law allows any “qualified professional” to discuss the information with the patient. Planned Parenthood and the ACLU believe the new requirement would place “extreme and unprecedented” requirements on women seeking abortion and would “unduly restrict” their access to the procedure.

Only time will tell how the courts will respond and then, ultimately, what direction the legislature will take.

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

800 New National Guard Jobs Coming to Missouri

Governor Eric Greitens recently joined Missouri National Guard Adjutant General Stephen Danner to announce hundreds of new jobs coming to Missouri. The two officials held a press conference at the Jefferson City Memorial Airport to reveal plans to grow the Guard with 800 new jobs. The new jobs include transportation units, military police units, and cyber units. Some of the units are being transferred from other states into Missouri. The governor says the new jobs are expected to have an economic impact of $15 million.

The new jobs include a new Transportation Battalion in southeast Missouri’s Fredericktown and a new Transportation Company in southwest Missouri’s Anderson and Monett. The new units also include the 1231st Transportation Company in Bridgeton and Columbia and the 1136th Military Police Company in Lebanon and Rolla. In addition, by the end of 2019, the new 1251st Transportation Company in Farmington and Perryville is expected to be in place, along with the 529th Trial Defense Team in Jefferson City and the 1135th Maintenance Company in Kansas City.

Missouri currently has approximately 9,300 Army National Guard soldiers.

Planned Parenthood Continues to Challenge Missouri’s Pro-Life Laws

Despite Missouri being a strongly pro-life state with an overwhelmingly pro-life legislature, organizations like Planned Parenthood continue to file lawsuits to challenge the laws put in place to protect the lives of the innocent unborn and the health of women. Most recently, Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union sued the state over a portion of the new law put in place by the legislature and the governor during a special session held this summer.

The two organizations are trying to block a provision of the bill (SB 5) that would require the doctor who will perform an abortion to give information about the procedure to the woman 72 hours before it is performed. Current Missouri law allows any “qualified professional” to discuss the information with the patient. Planned Parenthood and the ACLU believe the new requirement would place “extreme and unprecedented” requirements on women seeking abortion and would “unduly restrict” their access to the procedure.

Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley has said his office will vigorously defend the law. His office said the new law enacts “sensible regulations that protect the health of women in Missouri.” The challenged provision is one of several stronger safety regulations included in the bill that are meant to address a court ruling that struck down Missouri’s previous law that required abortion providers to abide by the same regulations imposed on ambulatory surgical centers. The court also did away with a law that required a doctor providing an abortion to have privileges at a nearby hospital. Supporters say the new regulations are necessary to ensure the safety and health of women using the facilities.

Lawmakers will now wait to see what happens with the lawsuit. The previous laws that were struck down by the courts have already paved the way for Planned Parenthood to seek licensing to perform abortions in Columbia, Springfield, and Joplin. For years Missouri has had only one abortion-providing facility in St. Louis. The Attorney General is now contesting this ruling as well in an effort to prevent the expansion of abortion providers throughout the state.

Upcoming Town Hall Meetings

As a reminder, I will be hosting four town hall meetings later this month in Cuba, Bourbon, Steelville, and St. James. These town hall meetings will be free and open to the public. I hope everyone comes out and participates in this great opportunity to ask questions and to find out more about what is happening at your state capitol.

The four town hall meetings will be held on the following dates:

  • Monday, October 30th at 9 AM
    Cuba City Hall Council Room (202 N Smith St., Cuba, MO 65453)
  • Monday, October 30th at 2 PM
    Bourbon Area Community Center (575 Elm St., Bourbon, MO 65441)
  • Tuesday, October 31st at 9 AM
    Steelville Community Center (101 W. Keysville, Steelville, MO 65565)
  • Tuesday, October 31st at 2 PM
    James Municipal Center/City Hall Meeting Room (100 S. Jefferson, St. James, MO 65559)

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

Advertisements

The Capitol Report | October 12th, 2017

REAL ID Update & Technology Grants

Recently, the Missouri Department of Revenue has contacted the legislature to provide an update on the implementation of REAL ID. As you may remember, during the 2017 legislative session, the Missouri General Assembly approved legislation to allow residents to obtain a photo ID that is compliant with the federal REAL ID Act. With the legislation approved this year, the federal government granted an extension to allow Missourians to continue to use their existing IDs as a valid form of ID until January 22nd, 2018. However, in regard to travel after that date, the Department of Homeland Security has yet to announce an extension. I will provide an update on this issue when more details are released.

In other news, full-time classroom teachers in public or private PreK-12 schools located in CenturyLink’s residential service areas and core corporate locations (St. Louis County, MO) may apply for a Teachers and Technology Grant for the 2017-18 school year. Applicants do not have to be CenturyLink customers in order to apply for these grants. Applications will be accepted from now until January 12, 2018. For more info, visit: http://www.centurylink.com/teachersandtechnology

As a reminder, I will be hosting four town hall meetings later this month in Cuba, Bourbon, Steelville, and St. James. These town hall meetings will be free and open to the public. I hope everyone comes out and participates in this great opportunity to ask questions and to find out more about what is happening at your state capitol.

The four town hall meetings will be held on the following dates:

  • Monday, October 30th at 9 AM
    Cuba City Hall Council Room (202 N Smith St., Cuba, MO 65453)
  • Monday, October 30th at 2 PM
    Bourbon Area Community Center (575 Elm St., Bourbon, MO 65441)
  • Tuesday, October 31st at 9 AM
    Steelville Community Center (101 W. Keysville, Steelville, MO 65565)
  • Tuesday, October 31st at 2 PM
    James Municipal Center/City Hall Meeting Room (100 S. Jefferson, St. James, MO 65559)

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

 

CenturyLink PreK-12 Teachers and Technology Grants

CenturyLink recently announced that they will be awarding over $1.4 million in technology grants in the spring of 2018. The CenturyLink Clarke M. Williams Foundation’s Teachers and Technology grants are designed to help fund projects that advance student success through the innovative use of technology in the classroom. Grants will range from $500 to $5,000.

Full-time classroom teachers in public or private PreK-12 schools located in CenturyLink’s residential service areas and core corporate locations (St. Louis County, MO) may apply for a Teachers and Technology Grant for the 2017-18 school year. Applicants do not have to be CenturyLink customers in order to apply for these grants. Applications will be accepted from now until January 12, 2018. For more info, visit: http://www.centurylink.com/teachersandtechnology

REAL ID Update for Missourians Planning to Travel in 2018

Most recently, the Missouri Department of Revenue has contacted the legislature to provide an update on the implementation of REAL ID. As you may remember, during the 2017 legislative session, the Missouri General Assembly approved legislation to allow residents to obtain a photo ID that is compliant with the federal REAL ID Act. With the legislation approved this year, the federal government granted an extension to allow Missourians to continue to use their existing IDs as a valid form of ID until January 22nd, 2018. However, in regard to travel after that date, the Department of Homeland Security has yet to announce an extension. I will provide an update on this issue when more details are released.

World Mental Health Day

October 10 marked World Mental Health Day, which is meant to raise awareness about mental health issues around the world. The day is also meant to help encourage and organize efforts to support mental health. The theme for this year is mental health in the workplace with an emphasis on looking at ways to improve the workplace experience to promote mental health and wellbeing.

Around the world more than300 million people suffer from depression, and 260 million suffer from anxiety disorders. Astudythe World Health Organization found that such disorders cost the global economy $1 trillion in lost productivity each year.

Some statistics of note regarding how mental health issues affect Americans include:

  • 1 in 5 (or 8 million) adults experience mental illness in a given year.
  • 1 in 25 (or 10 million) adults experience a serious mental illness.
  • 1 in 100 (or 4 million) live with schizophrenia.
  • 6% (or 6.1 million) of Americans have bipolar disorder.
  • 9% (or 16 million) suffer from severe depression.
  • 1% (or 42 million)live with an anxiety disorder.
  • 90% of those who die by suicide have an underlying mental illness.

Despite the prevalence of mental illness, only 41%of adults with a mental health condition received help and less than 50%of children 8-15 received mental health services. Furthermore, only 36.9%of those suffering from anxiety receive treatment, and less than 20%of Americans with moderate depressive symptoms sought help from a medical professional.

Despite less than encouraging statistics, there are a number of ways to get help if an individual or a loved one is struggling with a mental health condition. This year, a depression screening test appears alongside search results for depression-related queries. Many companies offer Assistance Programs, which provide support or benefits to employees with personal and/or work-related issues. Additionally, the National Alliance on Mental Illness provides a number of ways to support, including helplines, programs, and sheets. For more information, visit http://www.nami.org.

In Missouri, the legislature appropriated $157 million in funds for the Excellence in Mental Health Pilot Project. Missouri is one of a handful of states participating in the program to increase access to community mental health and substance abuse treatment services. The effort is part of the federal Excellence in Mental Health Act that was signed into law in 2014 to put certified community behavioral health clinics on a more equal footing with other health centers.

Upcoming Town Hall Meetings

As a reminder, I will be hosting four town hall meetings later this month in Cuba, Bourbon, Steelville, and St. James. These town hall meetings will be free and open to the public. I hope everyone comes out and participates in this great opportunity to ask questions and to find out more about what is happening at your state capitol.
The four town hall meetings will be held on the following dates:

  • Monday, October 30th at 9 AM
    Cuba City Hall Council Room (202 N Smith St., Cuba, MO 65453)
  • Monday, October 30th at 2 PM
    Bourbon Area Community Center (575 Elm St., Bourbon, MO 65441)
  • Tuesday, October 31st at 9 AM
    Steelville Community Center (101 W. Keysville, Steelville, MO 65565)
  • Tuesday, October 31st at 2 PM
    James Municipal Center/City Hall Meeting Room (100 S. Jefferson, St. James, MO 65559)

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

The Capitol Report | October 5th, 2017

Budget Committee Reviews PDMP Executive Order

This past July, Governor Grietens established a new prescription drug monitoring program by executive order. Recently, the House Budget Committee met to examine the methods used by the executive branch to create the new program. The hearing resulted in several members taking issue with the way the program was created.

The program the governor created includes a $250,000 no-bid contract with Express Scripts, under which that company provides data to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. The Department uses that data to try to identify prescription drug abusers.

Legislators on the budget committee are frustrated that the administration created and found a way to pay for that program without their input or approval. One member of the committee noted that it looks bad for the new program to have been announced at a time when the governor has withheld money from other state programs, and after the legislature refused to fund many things saying the state is in a tight budget year.

The Office of Administration’s budget director told legislators the money came from additional federal funds for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) that the state had not anticipated it would get.He said the administration was free to use that money as it saw fit, and used it to address what it sees as a crisis: prescription drug abuse.

Another member of the House Budget Committee pointed out that the administration circumvented the legislature’s authority and used money that could have supported other state needs, including some the legislature voted to pay for but then later saw the governor withhold the funding.

Criticism came from both supporters and opponents of prescription drug monitoring with those on both sides saying their problem was not with the program the governor launched, but with how he launched it. The House Budget Committee Chairman suggested the administration should not move forward with its drug monitoring program, and to instead bring it as a proposal to the legislature during the next budget process. urged administration officials to halt the transfer of that CHIP money to pay for the program, and to not sign a contract with Express Scripts. He called the use of that money, without the legislature’s approval, a “breach of trust.”

In other news, I was honored last week to be a part of an inspiring event for the students of the Steelville School District. Local pastors Jerry Beers and Kevin Farr partnered with Convoy of Hope, a non-profit organization from Springfield.

Steelville School District Free Shoes Using their program called Rural Compassion, every student in Steelville was provided with a free pair of shoes. Thank you to all those who donated their time to providing our area children with wonderful gifts. Also, thank you to the Steelville administrators for inviting me to be a part of it.

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

House Budget Committee Members Review the Methods Used to Create a New Prescription Drug Monitoring Program

The House Budget Committee met recently to examine the methods used by the executive branch to create a new prescription drug monitoring program. The hearing resulted in several members taking issue with the way the program was created.

The governor created the program with an executive order issued in July. It includes a $250,000 no-bid contract with Express Scripts, under which that company provides data to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. The Department uses that data to try to identify prescription drug abusers.

Legislators on the budget committee are frustrated that the administration created and found a way to pay for that program without their input or approval.

One member of the committee noted that it looks bad for the new program to have been announced at a time when the governor has withheld money from other state programs, and after the legislature refused to fund many things saying the state is in a tight budget year.

The Office of Administration’s budget director told legislators the money came from additional federal funds for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) that the state had not anticipated it would get. He said the administration was free to use that money as it saw fit, and used it to address what it sees as a crisis: prescription drug abuse.

Another member of the House Budget Committee pointed out that the administration circumvented the legislature’s authority and used money that could have supported other state needs, including some the legislature voted to pay for but then later saw the governor withhold the funding.

As the member said, “Now we could have that discussion of whether it’s more deserving to go to the kids, or whether it’s more deserving to go to the seniors, or whether it’s more deserving to go to those with disabilities, but at the end of the day you are taking that money from one of these other groups.”

Criticism came from both supporters and opponents of prescription drug monitoring with those on both sides saying their problem was not with the program the governor launched, but with how he launched it.

Criticism also came from both political parties as one Democratic member said it was “extremely frustrating” that CHIP money was used without any approval or authorization from the legislature. She said, “I hope that as you all continue to come up with these new ideas to address this crisis that you bring them to us before you start moving money around.”

The House Budget Committee Chairman suggested the administration should not move forward with its drug monitoring program, and to instead bring it as a proposal to the legislature during the next budget process. urged administration officials to halt the transfer of that CHIP money to pay for the program, and to not sign a contract with Express Scripts. He called the use of that money, without the legislature’s approval, a “breach of trust.”

Upcoming Town Hall Meetings

As a reminder, I will be hosting four town hall meetings in October in Cuba, Bourbon, Steelville, and St. James. These town hall meetings will be free and open to the public. I hope everyone comes out and participates in this great opportunity to ask questions and to find out more about what is happening at your state capitol.

The four town hall meetings will be held on the following dates:

  • Monday, October 30th at 9 AM
    Cuba City Hall Council Room (202 N Smith St., Cuba, MO 65453)
  • Monday, October 30th at 2 PM
    Bourbon Area Community Center (575 Elm St., Bourbon, MO 65441)
  • Tuesday, October 31st at 9 AM
    Steelville Community Center (101 W. Keysville, Steelville, MO 65565)
  • Tuesday, October 31st at 2 PM
    James Municipal Center/City Hall Meeting Room (100 S. Jefferson, St. James, MO 65559)

District Visit

Last week, I was honored to be a part of an inspiring event for the students of the Steelville School District. Local pastors Jerry Beers and Kevin Farr partnered with Convoy of Hope, a non-profit organization from Springfield.

Steelville School District Free Shoes

Using their program called Rural Compassion, every student in Steelville was provided with a free pair of shoes. Thank you to all those who donated their time to providing our area children with wonderful gifts. Also, thank you to the Steelville administrators for inviting me to be a part of it.

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

The Capitol Report | September 28th, 2017

Preserving Care and Local Town Halls

Two weeks ago, Senate and House leadership tasked their members with developing a solution to preserve in-home and nursing care for disabled Missourians who are impacted by a change in the point system that determines eligibility. Now, House Budget Chairman Scott Fitzpatrick and Senator Mike Cunningham say they are close to unveiling a solution they will be able to present to their colleagues as soon as next week.

On the last day of the 2017 legislative session, legislation was approved by the House in an attempt to preserve nursing and in-home care services for some of Missouri’s most vulnerable citizens. In the days leading up to the conclusion of the session, House and Senate members had worked to find a solution that would keep the vital services intact. The House had passed a version of the bill that would end the renter’s portion of the senior citizens property tax credit in order to generate funds that would be used to protect the existing level of service. The Senate countered by passing a version of the bill that would raise the funds by “sweeping” the unexpended monies from several state funds associated with regulatory boards and commissions.

With the Senate being unwilling to negotiate and no other options on the table, the House then approved the Senate solution and sent it to the governor’s desk. The governor then vetoed the bill calling it a “one-time gimmick” that drained funds from programs to prevent child abuse and neglect, assist injured workers, and to train police officers and firefighters. As the legislature did not have enough votes to override the governor’s veto during the annual Veto Session, House and Senate leaders tasked Fitzpatrick and Cunningham to develop a bipartisan solution to the problem.

House Speaker Todd Richardson and Senate Leader Ron Richard asked Fitzpatrick and Cunningham to develop a solution within a three-week timeframe that would preserve in-home and nursing care for disabled Missourians. They also asked the legislators to find a way to restore provider rate cuts, including cuts to private duty nurses who administer in-home neonatal care. Legislators now await details of the plan before deciding what steps to take next.

In other news, I will be hosting four town hall meetings in October in Cuba, Bourbon, Steelville, and St. James. These town hall meetings will be free and open to the public. I hope everyone comes out and participates in this great opportunity to ask questions and to find out more about what is happening at your state capitol.

The four town hall meetings will be held on the following dates:

  • Monday, October 30th at 9 AM
    Cuba City Hall Council Room (202 N Smith St., Cuba, MO 65453)
  • Monday, October 30th at 2 PM
    Bourbon Area Community Center (575 Elm St., Bourbon, MO 65441)
  • Tuesday, October 31st at 9 AM
    Steelville Community Center (101 W. Keysville, Steelville, MO 65565)
  • Tuesday, October 31st at 2 PM
    James Municipal Center/City Hall Meeting Room (100 S. Jefferson, St. James, MO 65559)

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

House and Senate Leaders Work Toward Solution to Preserve Care for Disabled Missourians

Two weeks ago, Senate and House leadership tasked their members with developing a solution to preserve in-home and nursing care for disabled Missourians who are impacted by a change in the point system that determines eligibility. Now, House Budget Chairman Scott Fitzpatrick and Senator Mike Cunningham say they are close to unveiling a solution they will be able to present to their colleagues as soon as next week.

On the last day of the 2017 legislative session, legislation was approved by the House in an attempt to preserve nursing and in-home care services for some of Missouri’s most vulnerable citizens. In the days leading up to the conclusion of the session, House and Senate members had worked to find a solution that would keep the vital services intact. The House had passed a version of the bill that would end the renter’s portion of the senior citizens property tax credit in order to generate funds that would be used to protect the existing level of service. The Senate countered by passing a version of the bill that would raise the funds by “sweeping” the unexpended monies from several state funds associated with regulatory boards and commissions.

With the Senate being unwilling to negotiate and no other options on the table, the House then approved the Senate solution and sent it to the governor’s desk. The governor then vetoed the bill calling it a “one-time gimmick” that drained funds from programs to prevent child abuse and neglect, assist injured workers, and to train police officers and firefighters. As the legislature did not have enough votes to override the governor’s veto during the annual Veto Session, House and Senate leaders tasked Fitzpatrick and Cunningham to develop a bipartisan solution to the problem.

House Speaker Todd Richardson and Senate Leader Ron Richard asked Fitzpatrick and Cunningham to develop a solution within a three-week timeframe that would preserve in-home and nursing care for disabled Missourians. They also asked the legislators to find a way to restore provider rate cuts, including cuts to private duty nurses who administer in-home neonatal care. Legislators now await details of the plan before deciding what steps to take next.

Convoy Honors America’s Veterans

Missourians who live along historic Route 66 were recently reminded of the important contributions made by America’s veterans. The “longest veterans parade in America” made up of 60 vintage military vehicles made its way through the Show-Me State as part of a 2,400 mile multi-state tour. Sponsored by the Military Vehicle Preservation Association, the convoy is made up of jeeps, ambulances, and trucks that were used to transport soldiers and supplies during World War II, as well as the Korean and Vietnam Wars.

Meant to celebrate veterans and demonstrate how the Army utilized its vehicles, the convoy started in Wheaton, Illinois on September 16 and will conclude in Santa Monica, California on October 14. The group covers between 100 and 180 miles each day at an average speed of roughly 35 miles per hour. During its trip through Missouri, the convoy made stops in many communities including St. Louis, St. Clair, Sullivan, Cuba, St. James, Rolla, Ft. Leonard Wood, Marshfield, Ozark, Branson, Mt. Vernon, and Carthage.

About two-thirds of convoy members are veterans. As the convoy commander said, the effort is an important way to reach out to the public to preserve history and celebrate veterans.

Upcoming Town Hall Meetings

I will be hosting four town hall meetings in October in Cuba, Bourbon, Steelville, and St. James. These town hall meetings will be free and open to the public. I hope everyone comes out and participates in this great opportunity to ask questions and to find out more about what is happening at your state capitol.

The four town hall meetings will be held on the following dates:

  • Monday, October 30th at 9 AM
    Cuba City Hall Council Room (202 N Smith St., Cuba, MO 65453)
  • Monday, October 30th at 2 PM
    Bourbon Area Community Center (575 Elm St., Bourbon, MO 65441)
  • Tuesday, October 31st at 9 AM
    Steelville Community Center (101 W. Keysville, Steelville, MO 65565)
  • Tuesday, October 31st at 2 PM
    James Municipal Center/City Hall Meeting Room (100 S. Jefferson, St. James, MO 65559)

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

The Capitol Report | September 21st, 2017

Transportation Funding & Projects

A few months ago the Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission approved the 2018-2022 Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), which includes 605 new projects covering 2,247 lane-miles of interstate, 3,302 miles of major routes, 7,462 miles of minor routes and 499 bridges.

Therefore, this week I would like to discuss the new upcoming transportation construction projects that will take place over the next few years in the 120th District. In addition, I will share some interesting transportation facts and information about Missouri.

Crawford County:

  • New pavement surface for Route 19 from Cherryville to Salem and Route BB (entire route)
  • New pavement surface for I-44 south outer road (old 66) from Cuba to Bourbon
  • New pavement surface for Route 49 from Route 19 to Route 32. Project includes the addition of two-foot paved shoulders and rumble strips. Project also includes pedestrian facility upgrades in Cuba.
  • Replace the bridge over Dry Fork Creek on Route 49
  • New pavement surface for I-44 from Route F to Route H
  • New pavement surface for Route DD and Route ZZ
  • Install lights and gates at Scott Road rail crossing

Phelps County:

  • New pavement surface for Route F and Route BB. Project includes the addition of two-foot paved shoulders and rumble strips for Route BB
  • New pavement surface for Route 68. Project includes the addition of two-foot paved shoulders and rumble strips
  • Replace the bridge over the Bourbeuse River on Route B

Missouri’s highway system is currently the 7th largest in the country but ranks 47th nationally in revenue per mile. Input from Missourians resulted in four goals from the state’s transportation system over the next 20 years:

1. Take care of the transportation system and services we enjoy today.

  1. Keep all travelers safe – no matter the mode of transportation.
  2. Invest in projects that spur economic growth and create jobs.
  3. Give Missourians better transportation choices.

Missourians pay a relatively small amount per month to use the state system of roads and bridges. The average Missouri driver pays about $30 per month in state and federal transportation taxes and fees. But there are also hidden transportation costs that Missourians may not realize they are absorbing when they sit on congested highways, drive on rough roads, or experience vehicle crashes. In fact, the monthly cost per driver, considering these additional factors, averages $169/month.

To calculate how much you pay, and for an in-depth citizen’s guide to transportation funding and issues in Missouri, visit: http://www.modot.org/guidetotransportation/

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

 

2018-2022 Statewide Transportation Improvement Program Approved

A few months ago the Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission approved the 2018-2022 Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), which includes 605 new projects covering 2,247 lane-miles of interstate, 3,302 miles of major routes, 7,462 miles of minor routes and 499 bridges.

“Our legislature and the citizens of Missouri have told us loud and clear to take care of this system. This plan does just that,” said Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) Director Patrick McKenna. “We focus limited resources on maintaining current conditions through every region of the state. However, limited funding enables us to only tread water. We improve roads and bridges at the same rate that others fall into disrepair.”

Therefore, this week I would like to discuss the new upcoming transportation construction projects that will take place over the next few years in the 120th District. In addition, I will share some interesting transportation facts and information about Missouri.

Upcoming Projects in Crawford County:

  • New pavement surface for Route 19 from Cherryville to Salem and Route BB (entire route)
  • New pavement surface for I-44 south outer road (old 66) from Cuba to Bourbon
  • New pavement surface for Route 49 from Route 19 to Route 32. Project includes the addition of two-foot paved shoulders and rumble strips. Project also includes pedestrian facility upgrades in Cuba.
  • Replace the bridge over Dry Fork Creek on Route 49
  • New pavement surface for I-44 from Route F to Route H
  • New pavement surface for Route DD and Route ZZ
  • Install lights and gates at Scott Road rail crossing

Upcoming Projects in Phelps County:

  • New pavement surface for Route F and Route BB. Project includes the addition of two-foot paved shoulders and rumble strips
  • New pavement surface for Route 68. Project includes the addition of two-foot paved shoulders and rumble strips
  • Replace the bridge over the Bourbeuse River on Route B

Transportation Facts About Missouri

Missouri’s highway system is currently the 7th largest in the country but ranks 47th nationally in revenue per mile. See how Missouri compares to other states: http://www.modot.org/guidetotransportation/documents/citizens_guide10-11.pdf

Input from Missourians resulted in four goals from the state’s transportation system over the next 20 years:

1. Take care of the transportation system and services we enjoy today.

  1. Keep all travelers safe – no matter the mode of transportation.
  2. Invest in projects that spur economic growth and create jobs.
  3. Give Missourians better transportation choices.

Missourians pay a relatively small amount per month to use the state system of roads and bridges. The average Missouri driver pays about $30 per month in state and federal transportation taxes and fees. But there are also hidden transportation costs that Missourians may not realize they are absorbing when they sit on congested highways, drive on rough roads, or experience vehicle crashes. In fact, the monthly cost per driver, considering these additional factors, averages $169/month!

To calculate how much you pay, visit: http://www.modot.org/TransportationDollars/TransportationDollars.html

How Transportation is Funded

Missouri’s transportation revenue totaled almost $2.5 billion in fiscal year 2016. As shown in the diagram below, nearly two-thirds of the revenue came from state user fees and one-third from federal revenue. A small fraction of funds came from Missouri’s General Revenue Fund, which receives revenue from the state income tax and the state’s general sales tax.

The $2.5 billion of revenue is distributed into five “buckets” for various transportation purposes as determined by state and federal laws. Each bucket has a unique blend of state and federal revenue, as depicted by the red, blue and gold colors.
For more details on transportation funding sources, visit: http://www.modot.org/guidetotransportation/documents/citizens_guide4-9.pdf

Where is the Money Invested?

MoDOT does not receive the entire $2.5 billion of transportation revenue, or the $30 per month from the average Missouri driver. After allocations to cities, counties, other state agencies and debt payment, MoDOT received $1.4 billion of transportation revenues in fiscal year 2016 to invest in the state transportation system. That equates to about $17 of the $30 per month Missouri drivers are paying.

Cities and counties in Missouri receive a share of state and federal transportation revenues for projects of their choosing. In fiscal year 2016, that totaled $408 million – $270 million in state funds and $138 million in federal funds.

Did you know? Distracted driving is a leading cause of crashes in Missouri. The Missouri State Highway Patrol reported that cellphones were involved in 2,237 crashes in 2015 alone.

State funds are distributed as specified in the state constitution. For fuel taxes, cities and counties receive 4.55 cents of the 17 cents per gallon rate, or about 27 percent. In fiscal year 2016, this totaled $186 million. For vehicle registration and driver’s licensing fees, cities and counties received $29 million, or about 9 percent. For motor vehicle sales tax, cities and counties received $55 million, or about 14 percent.

The distribution of federal funds is prescribed by federal law through transportation funding acts. The majority of federal revenue is dedicated to reimburse a share of eligible costs, which is typically 80 percent.

The majority of cities and counties also receive additional local revenues – most often from additional sales and property taxes – to build and maintain city streets and county roads. These amounts are not included in the totals discussed here.

Per the Missouri Constitution, the Missouri Department of Revenue (DOR) and the Missouri State Highway Patrol (MSHP) also receive transportation revenue. In fiscal year 2016, the amount totaled $250 million. The Highway Patrol receives funding for administering and enforcing state motor vehicle laws and traffic regulations. The Missouri General Assembly determines the amount available to the MSHP each year – $230 million was spent in fiscal year 2016.

The Department of Revenue receives funding for the cost to collect transportation taxes and fees. The cost of collection cannot exceed three percent of the particular tax or fee collected. In fiscal year 2016, the DOR received $20 million.

In summation, investments for state roads and bridges are summarized into five categories:

  1. Construction Program
  2. Maintenance
  3. Fleet, Facilities and Information Systems
  4. Administration
  5. Highway Safety Programs

Did you know? In 2016, there were 684 fatalities on Missouri roads. 63% of those fatalities involved an unbuckled person. A seat belt reduces you chances of serious injury by 45%. Buckle up!

The construction program is the largest area of investment in MoDOT’s budget, totaling $808 million in fiscal year 2016. It includes payments to contractors to build projects that maintain and improve the system ($664 million), MoDOT engineering costs associated with administering and monitoring the construction program – including salaries, wages and fringe benefits ($127 million), payments to engineering design consultants ($8 million) and the cost of acquiring right of way ($9 million).

The maintenance expenditures, totaling $430 million in fiscal year 2016, pay for the services performed by MoDOT employees like plowing snow and mowing. But it also includes maintaining the pavements on the state’s lower-volume routes, many of which are not eligible for federal reimbursement. It covers utilities, tools and materials needed in maintenance buildings across the state, bridge maintenance, signing, striping, sweeping, rumble stripes, lighting, etc. The maintenance budget also allows for traveler information and incident management services.

Fleet, facilities and information systems investments, totaling $79 million in fiscal year 2016, cover the costs of purchasing MoDOT’s fleet of trucks, constructing and maintaining MoDOT buildings and providing information technology that is needed for MoDOT to perform maintenance and engineering functions.

MoDOT’s administration costs – the second lowest in the nation – were $52 million in fiscal year 2016. That includes salaries, wages and fringe benefits to provide support services like human resources, accounting, legal, executive management, customer service, etc. Administration also includes medical insurance costs for MoDOT retirees.

Road and bridge investments include $19 million for highway safety programs that reduce fatalities and serious injuries, which includes salaries, wages and fringe benefits. In total, MoDOT invested $1.388 billion on state roads and bridges in fiscal year 2016. The remaining $46 million of available revenue was committed to future project costs.

For more information, and an in-depth citizen’s guide to transportation funding and issues in Missouri, visit: http://www.modot.org/guidetotransportation/
I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

The Capitol Report | September 14th, 2017

Veto Session Comes to a Close

The members of the Missouri House of Representatives came together Wednesday afternoon to discuss the pieces of legislation that were approved by the General Assembly but vetoed by the governor. Of the handful of bills to consider, HCB 3 received all of the discussion. Members debated the merits of overriding the governor’s veto versus working together to find another funding solution to preserve in-home and nursing care for more than 8,000 disabled Missourians.

HCB 3 was approved by the House on the last day of the legislative session in an attempt to preserve nursing and in-home care services for some of Missouri’s most vulnerable citizens. In the days leading up to the conclusion of the session, House and Senate members had worked to find a solution that would keep the vital services intact. The House had passed a version of the bill that would end the renter’s portion of the senior citizens property tax credit in order to generate funds that would be used to protect the existing level of service. The Senate countered by passing a version of the bill that would raise the funds by “sweeping” the unexpended monies from several state funds associated with regulatory boards and commissions.

With the Senate being unwilling to negotiate and no other options on the table, the House then approved the Senate solution and sent it to the governor’s desk. The governor then vetoed the bill calling it a “one-time gimmick” that drained funds from programs to prevent child abuse and neglect, assist injured workers, and to train police officers and firefighters.

Therefore, while all House members agreed action was necessary to prevent the vital services from being cut off for Missourians in need, the majority of members voted against the attempt to override the governor’s veto. The motion failed by a vote of 49-106. Members instead favor finding a more responsible solution that will allow the more than 8,000 disabled Missourians to receive the care they need.

As House members discussed a possible veto override of HCB 3, Senate Leader Ron Richard and House Speaker Todd Richardson announced that their two chambers will work together to develop a funding solution that will preserve in-home and nursing care for more than 8,000 disabled Missourians. Also to be considered is restoring provider rate cuts including cuts to private duty nurses who administer in-home neonatal care. Richard and Richardson have asked Sen. Mike Cunningham and House Budget Chair Scott Fitzpatrick to work together, and to work with their colleagues from both parties, to formulate a fiscally responsible plan that will ensure services are maintained for some of the state’s most vulnerable citizens.

In other news, finding updated information about Missouri’s economy just got a lot easier thanks to State Treasurer Eric Schmitt. Today, Schmitt announced the launch of MissouriDashboard.com where citizens can easily track and monitor Missouri’s economic performance. This is the first economic dashboard in the nation to be launched by a state treasurer’s office. Treasurer Schmitt and his team will utilize the data collected by the dashboard to conduct a comprehensive audit of the state’s economy over the coming months.

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

Missouri House Convenes for Annual Veto Session

The members of the Missouri House of Representatives came together Wednesday afternoon to discuss the pieces of legislation that were approved by the General Assembly but vetoed by the governor. Of the handful of bills to consider, HCB 3 received all of the discussion. Members debated the merits of overriding the governor’s veto versus working together to find another funding solution to preserve in-home and nursing care for more than 8,000 disabled Missourians.

HCB 3 was approved by the House on the last day of the legislative session in an attempt to preserve nursing and in-home care services for some of Missouri’s most vulnerable citizens. In the days leading up to the conclusion of the session, House and Senate members had worked to find a solution that would keep the vital services intact. The House had passed a version of the bill that would end the renter’s portion of the senior citizens property tax credit in order to generate funds that would be used to protect the existing level of service. The Senate countered by passing a version of the bill that would raise the funds by “sweeping” the unexpended monies from several state funds associated with regulatory boards and commissions.

With the Senate being unwilling to negotiate and no other options on the table, the House then approved the Senate solution and sent it to the governor’s desk. The governor then vetoed the bill calling it a “one-time gimmick” that drained funds from programs to prevent child abuse and neglect, assist injured workers, and to train police officers and firefighters.

While all House members agreed action was necessary to prevent the vital services from being cut off for Missourians in need, the majority of members voted against the attempt to override the governor’s veto. The motion failed by a vote of 49-106. Members instead favor finding a more responsible solution that will allow the more than 8,000 disabled Missourians to receive the care they need.

Missouri Senate and House to Develop Funding Solution for In-Home and Nursing Care for Disabled Missourians

As House members discussed a possible veto override of HCB 3, Senate Leader Ron Richard and House Speaker Todd Richardson announced that their two chambers will work together to develop a funding solution that will preserve in-home and nursing care for more than 8,000 disabled Missourians. Also to be considered is restoring provider rate cuts including cuts to private duty nurses who administer in-home neonatal care. Richard and Richardson have asked Sen. Mike Cunningham and House Budget Chair Scott Fitzpatrick to work together, and to work with their colleagues from both parties, to formulate a fiscally responsible plan that will ensure services are maintained for some of the state’s most vulnerable citizens.

“It’s our job even in tough budget years to protect our most vulnerable citizens,” said Richard, R-Joplin. “Preserving funding for in-home and nursing care is important to both chambers, and together with the House, we can come up with a plan to keep those funds for senior services intact.”

“Finding a viable solution to preserve these critical services for disabled Missourians has been, and continues to be, a top priority for the Missouri House and for the General Assembly,” said Richardson, R-Poplar Bluff. “I’m confident that Rep. Fitzpatrick can work with Sen. Cunningham and with Republicans and Democrats in both chambers to find a fiscally responsible solution.”

Richard and Richardson said they are asking Cunningham and Fitzpatrick to develop a proposal over the course of the next three weeks. They said once they have an acceptable plan, they will discuss available options to put the proposal into effect.

State Treasurer Launches Website to Track State’s Economic Performance

Finding updated information about Missouri’s economy just got a lot easier thanks to State Treasurer Eric Schmitt. Today, Schmitt announced the launch of MissouriDashboard.com where citizens can easily track and monitor Missouri’s economic performance.

The Missouri Economic Dashboard gives the public a snapshot of the state’s economic climate and features key data on unemployment, state and national debt, exports, housing, education and more. County-by-county breakdowns are available for several of the dashboard’s indicators.

“This new tool gives Missourians an easy way to check on our state’s economic status without sifting through spreadsheets and boring government reports,” said Schmitt. “The Missouri Economic Dashboard will dramatically increase transparency in economic data and help keep the public, business leaders and lawmakers up to date with the latest information.”

The dashboard was designed by a team of economists and government accounting experts to prioritize the most important economic indicators found within publicly available datasets. Figures will be updated regularly as new reports are published by government agencies.

MissouriDashboard.com is the first economic dashboard in the nation to be launched by a state treasurer’s office. Treasurer Schmitt and his team will utilize the data collected by the dashboard to conduct a comprehensive audit of the state’s economy over the coming months.

House Members Celebrate Master Key Anniversary at State Capitol

House members and visitors to the State Capitol recently celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Capitol Commission Board’s acceptance of the master key and custody of the Missouri State Capitol building. The Friends of the Missouri State Museum and the Missouri State Capitol Commission sponsored a reception and silent auction to commemorate the anniversary on Wednesday, September 13.

On September 13, 1917, the State Capitol Commission Board received keys to the nearly-complete Missouri State Capitol, which were presented by David Aronberg, a representative of John Gill and Sons Company, the building contractor. transfer ended a stormy relationship between the two parties and enabled the Commission to closely inspect the building and supervise the final construction details before officially declaring the building complete.

Lawmakers and members of the public gathered in the rotunda on the third floor of the Capitol for the event. The silent auction featured 17 special prints of historic Capitol photographs from the Missouri State Museum’s collection. Proceeds from the auction will be used to benefit the conservation of the Museum’s diverse collection of artifacts.

The Missouri State Archives also displayed “Pillars of the State: The Centennial of the Missouri State Capitol.” The collection of photographs and information detail the construction and decoration of the Capitol building.

This special event served as the finale to a series of centennial events commemorating construction of the Capitol building.

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov

The Capitol Report | September 7th, 2017

Legislative Veto Session Approaches

As mandated by the Missouri Constitution, the General Assembly will meet Wednesday, September 13 to consider bills that were passed by the House and Senate but vetoed by the governor. The annual Veto Session gives legislators a final opportunity to enact their ideas into law despite the governor’s objections. In both chambers, a two-thirds vote is required to override a veto. In the House that amounts to 109 votes. Twenty-three votes are needed in the Senate to successfully complete an override motion.

The 2016 Veto Session activity brought the total number of veto overrides in state history up to 119. Prior to the administration of Governor Jay Nixon, the total number of veto overrides in Missouri history stood at 22. In total, the legislature managed to override the governor 97 times during his eight years of service. Heading into this Veto Session it appears unlikely that the legislature will add to the veto override total as the new governor and the current General Assembly have worked together on most of the issues addressed in 2017. The current governor’s veto totals are far lower than those of his predecessor. Of the bills sent to his desk by the legislature, Governor Greitens vetoed only one House Bill, one House Committee Bill, one House Concurrent Resolution, and two Senate Bills. He also issued line item vetoes in three appropriations bills. More will be discussed on these bills after the results of veto session next week.

Also, as promised, below is a brief summary of additional bills the legislature has passed this regular session. These final TAFP’d bills wrap up the bill summaries just in time for Veto Session next Wednesday.

SB 395 (Signed by Governor: 6/23) – Modifies provisions relating to the practice of public accounting including lowering the age that someone can become licensed as an accountant from 21 to 18.

SB 421 (Signed by Governor: 7/5) – Modifies provisions relating to the conveyance of state property including allowing the Governor to not be required to obtain authorization for granting easements to political subdivisions, rural electric cooperatives, railroads, to accommodate utility service provided to state property or facilities, to accommodate ingress and egress on state properties, or to facilitate the use of common elements of condominium property if the state is a unit owner.

SB 486 (Signed by Governor: 7/11) – Authorizes the conveyance of a certain state property located in Cole County to the City of Jefferson

SB 501 (Signed by Governor: 7/14) – Modifies provisions relating to health care including requiring the Department of Health and Senior Services to contract with a third party for the establishment of a health care directives registry for the purpose of providing a place to securely store an advance health care directive online and to give authorized health care providers immediate access to the directive.

SB 503 (Signed by Governor: 7/11) – Modifies provisions relating to emergency services including requiring the Committee for 911 Oversight to designate a state 911 coordinator.

SCR 4 (Signed by Leadership: 5/22) – Applies to Congress for the calling of an Article V convention of states to propose certain amendments to the United States Constitution which place limits on the federal government.

You may read in more detail about what is happening at your State Capitol below.

As always, I will work diligently for you as your State Representative.

-Jason

 

 

 

Legislative Veto Session Approaches

As mandated by the Missouri Constitution, the General Assembly will meet Wednesday, September 13 to consider bills that were passed by the House and Senate but vetoed by the governor. The annual Veto Session gives legislators a final opportunity to enact their ideas into law despite the governor’s objections. In both chambers, a two-thirds vote is required to override a veto. In the House that amounts to 109 votes. Twenty-three votes are needed in the Senate to successfully complete an override motion.

The 2016 Veto Session activity brought the total number of veto overrides in state history up to 119. Prior to the administration of Governor Jay Nixon, the total number of veto overrides in Missouri history stood at 22. In total, the legislature managed to override the governor 97 times during his eight years of service. Heading into this Veto Session it appears unlikely that the legislature will add to the veto override total as the new governor and the current General Assembly have worked together on most of the issues addressed in 2017. The current governor’s veto totals are far lower than those of his predecessor. Of the bills sent to his desk by the legislature, Governor Greitens vetoed only one House Bill, one House Committee Bill, one House Concurrent Resolution, and two Senate Bills. He also issued line item vetoes in three appropriations bills. More will be discussed on these bills after the results of veto session next week.

Truly Agreed To & Finally Passed Bills

Now that the regular and both special legislative sessions have come to an end, the legislature stands at a little over 75 bills that have been Truly Agreed to and Finally Passed (TAFP). These TAFP bills span a variety of topics. Below is a brief summary of additional TAFP bills. These final TAFP’d bills wrap up the bill summaries just in time for Veto Session next Wednesday.

SB 395 (Signed by Governor: 6/23) – Modifies provisions relating to the practice of public accounting

The act modifies several definitions related to the profession of accountancy. The act also lowers the age that someone can become licensed as an accountant from 21 to 18. A certified public accounting firm that does not have an office in the state of Missouri may offer or perform attest or compilation services in Missouri without a permit if it meets certain requirements, as set forth in the act. All firms practicing public accounting in the state of Missouri shall register with the Secretary of State, unless they are exempted as described in the act.

Also, the act repeals a provision stating that a licensee who supervises review services or signs or authorizes someone to sign review reports shall meet competency requirements as determined by the Board. The act also repeals a provision that states that, prior to January 1, 2008, licensees who perform fewer than 3 attest services a year shall be exempt from the requirement to undergo peer review as described in the act.

SB 421 (Signed by Governor: 7/5) – Modifies provisions relating to the conveyance of state property

Currently, the Governor is not required to obtain legislative authorization for the conveyance or transfer of certain properties to certain entities, including easements for rural electric cooperatives, municipal corporations, and public utilities. Instead, under this act, the Governor need not be required to obtain such authorization for granting easements to political subdivisions, rural electric cooperatives, railroads, to accommodate utility service provided to state property or facilities, to accommodate ingress and egress on state properties, or to facilitate the use of common elements of condominium property if the state is a unit owner. The easement shall be used for purposes set forth in this act.

SB 486 (Signed by Governor: 7/11) – Authorizes the conveyance of a certain state property located in Cole County to the City of Jefferson

This act authorizes the conveyance of a certain state property located in Cole County to the City of Jefferson.

SB 501 (Signed by Governor: 7/14) – Modifies provisions relating to health care

This act requires the Department of Health and Senior Services to contract with a third party for the establishment of a health care directives registry for the purpose of providing a place to securely store an advance health care directive online and to give authorized health care providers immediate access to the directive. The third party contractor shall be solely responsible for the administration and maintenance of the registry. All data and information contained in the registry shall remain confidential and shall be exempt from the Sunshine Law. An “advance health care directive” is defined as either a power of attorney for health care or a declaration signed by an adult declarant containing the person’s direction concerning a health care decision.

Among other provisions, this act allows a physician to prescribe epinephrine (EPI) auto-injectors in the name of an authorized entity for use in certain emergency situations. Pharmacists, physicians, and other persons authorized to dispense prescription medications may dispense EPI auto-injectors under a prescription issued in the name of an authorized entity. An “authorized entity” is defined as any entity or organization at or in connection with locations where allergens capable of causing anaphylaxis may be present, including but not limited to restaurants, recreation camps, youth sports leagues, amusement parks, and sports arenas.

SB 503 (Signed by Governor: 7/11) – Modifies provisions relating to emergency services

The act provides that no emergency medical technician shall be liable, if acting in good faith and without gross negligence, for the administration of a patient’s personal medication when deemed necessary. This act also changes the name of the Advisory Committee for 911 Service Oversight to the Missouri 911 Service Board. The number of Board members is reduced from 16 to 15, and the composition of the Board is changed. The Board shall have no authority over certain emergency communications services providers.

No corporation or its affiliate shall have more than one member on the Board, subject to the exception that all members appointed as of August 28, 2017, shall continue to serve the remainder of their terms. Additional new powers and responsibilities of the Board are specified including compliance with federal standards, coordinating services, planning and implementing improvements to technological systems, and collaborating with other bodies of state government. The Board is required to designate a coordinator who shall be responsible for overseeing state 911 operations.

SCR 4 (Signed by Leadership: 5/22) – Applies to Congress for the calling of an Article V convention of states to propose certain amendments to the United States Constitution which place limits on the federal government

This concurrent resolution applies to the United States Congress, under the provisions of Article V of the United States Constitution, for the calling of a convention of the states for the limited purpose of proposing amendments to the U.S. Constitution that impose fiscal restraint on the federal government, limit the power and jurisdiction of the federal government, and limit the terms of office for federal officials and members of Congress. This application shall expire five years after the passage of this resolution.

District Event

Osage Nation DedicationOn Saturday, September 9th, Chief Geoffrey M. Standing Bear and a large delegation (more than 60 members) from the Osage Nation, will be returning to Cuba, MO. On that day, the Osage Nation will place a blessing upon the Osage Monument and the Osage Mural. While there is still landscaping and design work to be done, on both the monument and mural, the Osage Nation has been deeply moved by our efforts. September 9th will be a day to honor the projects and to celebrate the meaningful relationships that have been built.

At 9:30 a.m., the ceremony for the blessing of the Osage Monument will begin on-site at the Cuba, MO, Visitors Center. During this ceremony, Chief Standing Bear will speak with the audience. Additionally, this ceremony will include a smoke blessing and Native Osage Prayers. Beginning at approximately 10:45 a.m., the ceremony for the blessing of the Osage Mural will begin on-site at the Osage Mural. The mural is located on Buchanan Street in the Historic Route 66 Mural District of downtown Cuba, MO. During this ceremony, members of the Osage Delegation will offer a few brief words and members of the Osage Delegation will also perform native song and dance. Immediately following the blessing of the Osage Mural, there will be a light reception held at Recklein Auditorium located on N. Smith Street in Cuba, MO. During this time, members of the public will be able to visit with members of the Osage Nation in honor and celebration of the day. Light refreshments will be served.

The ceremonies and reception are free, open to the public, and all are welcome to attend.

 

I am committed to serve the constituents of the 120th District, so please feel free to contact my office anytime at 573-751-1688. Your District 120 Capitol Office is 201 W Capitol Ave, Rm 415-B, Jefferson City, MO 65101. If you wish to unsubscribe from this report, please email Dylan Bryant at dylan.bryant@house.mo.gov